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I have sorted array

{1,2,3,5,5,5,7,8,8}

I would like to count how many times the number that i am sending is found in the array in longn only.

for example:

public static int count(int[] array,5)

will reply 3

public static int count(int[] array,8)

will reply 2

so my plan is:

1) to do a binary search to find the number

2) binary search the top border index and the bottom border index.

3) print (top index - bottom index) will give me the time of target number in the array.

Is my code is logn ? Please help! :)

    public class binarySearch
{
    public static void main(String[]args)
    {
        System.out.println("d");
        int[]data={1,1,2,3,1,1,1};
        System.out.println(count(data,1));
    }

    public static int count(int[] a, int x)
    {
        int low=0;
        int high = a.length-1;
        int count=0;

        while(low <=high)
        {
            int mid=((low+high)/2);         
            if(x>a[mid])
                low=mid+1;
            if(x<a[mid])
                high=mid-1;

            if(x==a[mid])            
            {
                int top=findTopIndex(a,x,mid);                
                int bottom=findBottomIndex(a,x,mid);
                return (top-bottom);

            }

        }    
        return 111111111;

    }

    public static int findTopIndex(int[] a, int x, int index)
    {
        int low=index;
        int high = a.length-1;    
        int mid;
        if(x==a[high])
        return high;

        while(low <= high)
        {            
           mid=((low+high)/2);         
           if(x<a[mid]&&x==a[mid-1])
           return mid-1;
           else if(x==a[mid])
                low=mid+1;
           else if(a[mid]>x && a[mid-1]!=x)
           high=mid-1;


        } 
        return 11111111;

    }
    public static int findBottomIndex(int[] a, int x, int index)
    {
        int low=0;
        int high = index-1;    
        int mid;
        if(x==a[low])
        return low-1;

        while(low <= high)
        {            
         mid=((low+high)/2);         
           if(x>a[mid]&&x==a[mid+1])
           return mid;
           else if(x==a[mid])
                high=mid-1;
           else if(a[mid]<x && a[mid+1]!=x)
           low=mid+1;

        } 
        return 111;

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Do you need to search for the border indices with binary search? Seems that it'd be fast enough if you continue with a linear search after that. –  millimoose Jan 7 '13 at 14:01
    
Use else if instead of if if if... –  Achintya Jha Jan 7 '13 at 14:02
2  
@millimoose what for {1,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,5,8}? –  Alvin Wong Jan 7 '13 at 14:03
    
@AlvinWong Depends on exactly how likely the scenario is with your data sets. Worst-case linear complexity isn't exactly terrible. You're also assuming that it's also possible to find the edges of that run of fives efficiently. –  millimoose Jan 7 '13 at 14:09
    
@millimoose then linear search will save more time. –  Alvin Wong Jan 7 '13 at 14:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you have written is really close to the solution you need. You first do a binary search to find a single instance of the number you are searching for(let's say its found on position index) and then you do two more binary searches -one for the sequence 0, index, and one for index, size to find up to where in both sequences is the number found.

So I suggest you simply pass an index to both findTopIndex and findBottomIndex and make use of it. I can write the whole solution but it will be better for you to come to it on your own.

share|improve this answer
    
This is a good approach, I totally missed the O(logn) part on my (deleted) answer. A list full of the same elements results in O(n). –  Gamb Jan 7 '13 at 14:07
    
If there's a very long run of the same number, couldn't the "two more" searches also land somewhere in the middle of the respective two halves of said run? Seems like you'd want to search recursively to find the top and bottom indices - i.e. when you can't find the number anymore to the left of the current index, the current index is the beginning of the run. (And vice versa.) –  millimoose Jan 7 '13 at 14:13
    
@millimoose no, the two additional binary searches are performed in a different manner as to find the first position differing from x. The monotonous property I use for those searches is equal to x and by doing a single binary search one could find the single index where this property changes from 0 to 1. –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 7 '13 at 14:16

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