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Consider a class X with N member variables, each of some copiable and movable type, and N corresponding setter functions. In C++98, the definition of X would likely look something like this:

class X
{
public:
    void set_a(A const& a) { _a = a; }
    void set_b(B const& b) { _b = b; }
    ...
private:
    A _a;
    B _b;
    ...
};

Setter functions of class X above can bind both to lvalue and to rvalue arguments. Depending on the actual argument, this might result in the creation of a temporary and will eventually result in a copy assignment; due to this, non-copiable types are not supported by this design.

With C++11 we have move semantics, perfect forwarding, and universal references (Scott Meyers's terminology), which allow for a more efficient and generalized use of setter functions by rewriting them this way:

class X
{
public:
    template<typename T>
    void set_a(T&& a) { _a = std::forward<T>(a); }

    template<typename T>
    void set_b(T&& b) { _b = std::forward<T>(b); }
    ...
private:
    A _a;
    B _b;
    ...
};

Universal references can bind to const/non-const, volatile/non-volatile, and to any convertible type in general, avoiding the creation of temporaries and passing values straight to operator =. Non-copiable, movable types are now supported. Possibly undesired bindings can be eliminated either through static_assert or through std::enable_if.

So my question is: as a design guideline, should all (let's say, most) setter functions in C++11 be written as function templates accepting universal references?

Apart from the more cumbersome syntax and the impossibility of using Intellisense-like helper tools when writing code in those setter functions, are there any relevant disadvantages with the hypothetical principle "write setter functions as function templates accepting universal references whenever possible"?

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1  
@AlexandreC. that example seems like a bad one. Did you know that constructor will get picked over a regular copy constructor (i.e. declared as foo(foo const&)) for making copies (flamingdangerzone.com/cxx11/2012/06/05/is_related.html)? It doesn't forward initializer lists properly either. On the other hand, the language now has inherited ctors (compiler writers, could you pretty please with sugar on top implement these?), so you can get something much more robust than that ctor that with a simple using bar::bar;. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 7 '13 at 14:12
2  
@sehe: those setter functions are intentionally simplistic, there might be something more going on in there than just assigning. –  Andy Prowl Jan 7 '13 at 14:15
2  
@sehe: maybe a future implementation will not actually have an a field, but will still logically implement set_a by otherwise storing whatever attributes it needs from the specified instance of A. Or perhaps in future the value of the field will not be orthogonal to all other data members, so set_a might update something else too. I know, YAGNI, but if the class was called URL then I wouldn't necessarily want to commit to a public protocol data member of type string even though I am willing to commit to always having a set_protocol member function. –  Steve Jessop Jan 7 '13 at 14:33
2  
@sehe: I fail to see your point. I may have a member variable which requires non-trivial setting/getting (my example was just simplification, assignment could be just a part of what is going on there). Why shouldn't I have getter/setter functions for that? Of course I did not show getter functions in my example because they are irrelevant to the question I am asking, but this doesn't mean those properties are write-only. –  Andy Prowl Jan 7 '13 at 14:41
3  
@sehe What about firing an a_changed() event in the future for example? Or debugging the change of the property... –  leemes Jan 7 '13 at 15:14

1 Answer 1

up vote 31 down vote accepted

You know the classes A and B, so you know if they are movable or not and if this design is ultimately necessary. For something like std::string, it's a waste of time changing the existing code unless you know you have a performance problem here. If you're dealing with auto_ptr, then it's time to rip it out and use unique_ptr.

It's usually preferred now to take arguments by value if you don't know anything more specific- such as

void set_a(A a) { _a = std::move(a); }

This permits the use of any of the constructors of A without requiring anything except movability and offers a relatively intuitive interface.

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I see your point, but this would cause an unnecessary move if set_a is invoked with an rvalue, isn't it so? –  Andy Prowl Jan 7 '13 at 14:17
    
@AndyProwl: I think not necessarily, since I think the move from the rvalue to a can be elided if the rvalue is a temporary. The move from there to _a can't be elided no matter what you do since it's assignment not construction. I suspect you're right in the case where someone calls set_a(std::move(something)) though: barring inlining and "as-if" optimizations there will be two moves, whereas your template function moves only once. –  Steve Jessop Jan 7 '13 at 14:38
    
@SteveJessop: you are right about elision, i did implicitly referr to rvalues obtained as the result of invoking std::move. should have mentioned that explicitly –  Andy Prowl Jan 7 '13 at 14:44
5  
OK, I will accept this answer and take the design principle I was looking for as follows: "For setter functions like the ones shown in the example, if the type is movable and the performance of move construction is not an issue, then take arguments by value; otherwise, use universal references and rule out unwanted bindings through std::enable_if or static_assert; in any case, avoid taking arguments by const ref (again: for setter functions like the ones in the example)". Thank you –  Andy Prowl Jan 7 '13 at 16:05
2  
This is false, for something like a std::string, accepting the argument by value causes a guaranteed allocation anytime the function is called with an lvalue. Whereas passing by const reference, the real work happens in the assignment inside the function body, since the real work happens in copy assignment and not copy construction, pre-allocated space can be reused if sufficiently large. You can benchmark this in a loop and you'll see that const ref crushes value for lvalue calls. If you want the speed boost for rvalues, you should implement an rvalue overload. –  Nir Friedman Sep 30 at 20:32

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