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This is my first question on SO, so sorry if it's silly, but it's something that really puzzled me when I recently came across it in production code. I've boiled my problem down to the two blocks of code, which I expected to do the same thing, namely produce a random number for each iteration:

for my $num (0 .. 5) {
    my $id = int rand 10;
    print "$id\n";    
}

and

for (0 .. 5) {
    my $tmp;
    my $id = $tmp if $tmp;

    $id = int rand 10 unless $id;
    print "$id\n";
}

The first one does what I expect it to do, but the second one gives the same number for any number of iterations. $tmp is always undefined in this simplification, so it's only there to show the behaviour, as leaving out = $tmp if $tmp produces the result I'd expect.

I'd appreciate any insight into why this happens.

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Tested on v5.8.5, v5.10.0 and v5.14.2. –  flesk Jan 7 '13 at 14:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The reason for the strange behaviour is that you have made the declaration of $id, as well as the assignment to it, conditional on the truth of $tmp, which makes Perl throw a fit. perldoc perlsyn has this to say about it

NOTE: The behaviour of a my, state, or our modified with a statement modifier conditional or loop construct (for example, my $x if ... ) is undefined. The value of the my variable may be undef, any previously assigned value, or possibly anything else. Don't rely on it. Future versions of perl might do something different from the version of perl you try it out on. Here be dragons.

You can demonstrate this for yourself if you change the code as follows, which works fine.

for (0 .. 5) {
    my $tmp;
    my $id;
    $id = $tmp if $tmp;

    $id = int rand 10 unless $id;
    print "$id\n";
}
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Thanks. I never noticed that note before, or at least contemplated the implications of it. –  flesk Jan 7 '13 at 14:55
    
or my $id = $tmp ? $tmp : undef; or my $id = $tmp || undef;. But since you don't differentiate between different false values, you could just as easily use my $id = $tmp;. –  ikegami Jan 7 '13 at 20:10

the behaviour of a statement modifier is undefined after a my ... (see perlsyn). So don't use that...

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You've stumbled across a bug that has long remained deliberately unfixed because it's useful. The line

my $id = $tmp if $tmp;

applies a statement modifier (the if) to a variable declaration (the my). Conditionally defining a variable doesn't make much sense, but because my has both compile-time and run-time behavior this effectively creates a state variable: i.e. a variable that is lexically scoped to the enclosing block but which maintains its value between executions of that block.

The usual form for (deliberately) invoking the behavior you're seeing is

my $x if 0;

This behavior has been deprecated since Perl 5.10, which added state variables to do this cleanly. Modern versions of Perl (5.10+) will emit the warning

Deprecated use of my() in false conditional

Even prior to version 5.10 using this was somewhat poor form as emulating state variables could be done cleanly (though not as succinctly) by adding an enclosing block and declaring the variable there. For example:

{
  my $n = 0;
  sub increment { return $n++; }
}
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"This behavior has been deprecated since Perl 5.10" is quite wrong. The warning has been appearing since then, but it's been documented as deprecated far longer than that. Actually, it's been documented as undefined (very dangerous to use right now), which is far worse than deprecated (going to stop working any time now). –  ikegami Jan 7 '13 at 20:14
1  
@ikegami: While this behavior is officially undefined it is well (if not widely) known. The addition and wording of the warning implicitly acknowledge it as a "feature" although it was certainly never an intentional one. So while you're technically correct as a practical matter I stand by my wording. Perl: So good about backwards-compatibility that even the bugs get deprecation cycles. :-P –  Michael Carman Jan 7 '13 at 21:13

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