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The problem I'm having is with a polymorphic class: the animal class has a function "virtual animal* get() = 0;" which is defined in the dog class as "dog* get() { speak2(); return this; }".

I've read somewhere a while ago that changing the return type this way is legal but it doesn't seem to work as I expected: when the get function is called it prints the expected value but when I try to assign the return value to the dog class pointer I get a invalid conversion error, and when I try to call the speak2() function it says that it has no such member.

What I'm looking for is to be able to call something along the lines of "barn.front()->get()->speak2();". Is there any way to achieve something similar to this without any dynamic_casts or any such casts?

I've named the classes in a logical manner so its easy to read and also added some notes in the form of comments throughout the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class animal
{
public:
    virtual ~animal() {}
    virtual void speak1() = 0;
    virtual animal* get() = 0;
};

class dog : public animal
{
public:
    void speak1() { cout << "print-speak1!"; }
    void speak2() { cout << "print-speak2!"; }
    dog* get() { speak2(); return this; }
};

int main()
{
    vector<animal*> barn;

    barn.push_back(new dog());

    barn.front()->speak1();                // prints "print-speak1!"
    barn.front()->get();                   // prints "print-speak2!"

    barn.front()->get()->speak2();
    // error: 'class animal' has no member named 'speak2'
    // but then why does "barn.front()->get();" print "print-speak2!"?

    dog* dogptr = barn.front()->get();
    // error: invalid conversion from 'animal*' to 'dog*' [-fpermissive]

    dogptr->speak2();
    // for the sake of -Werror=unused-variable

    for(vector<animal*>::iterator i = barn.begin(); i != barn.end(); ++i)
    {
        delete *i;
    }
    barn.clear();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
It is legal, however, bear in mind that barn.front() is an animal* and not a dog*, so barn.front()->get() is statically typed to return animal*. You can only make use of the override returning dog* if you call it through a dog*. –  Angew Jan 7 '13 at 14:46
1  
Why do you need to know your animal is a dog? –  andre Jan 7 '13 at 14:46
    
@ahenderson I don't I actually just want to call barn.front()->get()->speak2(); from a linked list (vector in this case) that holds the animal pointer. Imagine that theres also a cat with a speak3() function. –  Edward A Jan 7 '13 at 14:50
    
Look at it this way: Barn can contain any animal. So if you get some animal from the barn, you don't know if its a dog or a cat or a horse. If you know the animal in the front of the barn is always a dog, then you should not mix it with other animals in a generic barn, but rather have the dog as a special member of the barn (barn here being a separate type, something like struct barn { dog* front; vector<animal*> animals; }; –  Fiktik Jan 7 '13 at 14:55
    
@Fiktik I wrote a clarification comment to tomislav-maric's answer, in the actual code I'm not using a vector, I'm in fact using a implementation of a doubly linked list that I manually manage, I need a way to call barn.find("dog")->get()->dog_specific_func(); but also call barn.find("cat")->get()->cat_specific_func(); –  Edward A Jan 7 '13 at 15:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There are two things going on with your code at different times. First, the compiler sees the return type of barn.front() as animal*. No matter what you do. Calling member speak2() on type animal* always fails.

Your member get() is a virtual function, and with line barn.front()->get(); is invoked using a virtual dispatch. This means that the function that gets called is only known at runtime, based on what is the real (so-called dynamic) type of the animal. That way you can modify what the behaviour of get() is for each animal.

Differing return value of get() does not matter here. The type checking that compiler does is (obviously) done at compile time, and thus against animal::get(). The covariant return type is only useful if you do a direct call to an object of static type dog.

In your case, a hackish way would be to cast the type to dog, something like

static_cast<dog*>(barn.front())->speak2();

Of course you will burn if the actual type of the barn.front() is not a dog. And by that I mean undefined behaviour - the program may crash, throw exception or silently continue with corrupted data.

More correct approach in my oppinion would be to separate different actions into a generic interface, like:

class animal
{
public:
    virtual ~animal() {}
    virtual void makeSound() = 0;
};

class dog : public animal
{
public:
    void bark() { cout << "hoof"; }
    void makeSound() { bark(); }
};

class cat : public animal
{
public:
    void meow() { cout << "meow"; }
    void makeSound() { meow(); }
};

int main()
{
    vector<animal*> barn;
    barn.push_back(new dog());
    barn.push_back(new cat());
    barn.front()->makeSound();
    barn[1]->makeSound();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wonderful answer, but one last thing before I mark it as accepted: is there any way to achieve anything similar to such behaviour, if so, what would be the best way to do it. By that I mean something similar to calling barn.front()->get()->dog_specific_func();. EDIT: I see you edited your answer, thank you. –  Edward A Jan 7 '13 at 15:28

The whole point of programming to interfaces is to use the interface class as the access point and rely on the implemented concrete types to conform to the interface. For you this means that you should access the actual animals in your vector via the pointer to animal. If you define speak2() as a pure virtual function within the animal class and use the animal* instead of dog*, your program will run. The question remains if all animals will have speak2() ability, but that's the issue of the design. Notice that I have placed the using directive below the class implementation, since it is not a good practice to have using namespace directives within library code.

Here's the code with changes:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

class animal
{
public:
    virtual ~animal() {}
    virtual void speak1() = 0;
    virtual void speak2() = 0;
    virtual animal* get() = 0;
};

class dog : public animal
{
public:
    void speak1() { std::cout << "print-speak1!" << std::endl; }
    void speak2() { std::cout << "print-speak2!" << std::endl; }
    dog* get() { speak2(); return this; }
};

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    vector<animal*> barn;

    barn.push_back(new dog());

    barn.front()->speak1();                // prints "print-speak1!"
    barn.front()->get();                   // prints "print-speak2!"

    barn.front()->get()->speak2();
    // error: 'class animal' has no member named 'speak2'
    // but then why does "barn.front()->get();" print "print-speak2!"?

    animal* dogptr = barn.front()->get();
    // error: invalid conversion from 'animal*' to 'dog*' [-fpermissive]

    dogptr->speak2();
    // for the sake of -Werror=unused-variable

    for(vector<animal*>::iterator i = barn.begin(); i != barn.end(); ++i)
    {
        delete *i;
    }
    barn.clear();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, your changes makes the code run, but this code is a mere example of what I'm trying to achieve. Imagine the animal class is in fact a modules_manager, and the dog is a module such as network, theres more modules, such as lets say sound, those two modules got different functions. Hence why what I'm trying to get is something along the lines of "barn.front()->get()->speak7();" even though speak7 is not defined in the animal class. –  Edward A Jan 7 '13 at 14:56

When you use barn->front()->get(), you have access to a animal* pointer. Speak2() is not defined for animal, thus the no member error.

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Given

class animal
{
public:
    virtual animal * get () = 0;
};


class dog : animal
{
public:
    virtual dog * get () {...}
};

Then,

// Compiler sees call to "dog::get()".
dog * d = new dog();
d->get();


// Compiler sees call to "animal::get()", which may return
// an instance of any type derived from "animal".
animal * a = d;
d->get();
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