Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

C++ references are still confusing to me. Suppose I have a function/method which creates an object of type Foo and returns it by reference. (I assume that if I want to return the object, it cannot be a local variable allocated on the stack, so I must allocate it on the heap with new):

Foo& makeFoo() {
    ...
    Foo* f = new Foo;
    ...
    return *f;
}

When I want to store the object created in a local variable of another function, should the type be Foo

void useFoo() {

    Foo f = makeFoo();
    f.doSomething();
}

or Foo&?

void useFoo() {

    Foo& f = makeFoo();
    f.doSomething();
}

Since both is correct syntax: Is there a significant difference between the two variants?

share|improve this question
4  
(I assume that if I want to return the object, it cannot be a local variable allocated on the stack, so I must allocate it on the heap with new) This is taking a problem, and making it worse. Simply do not return the variable by reference: return it by value and let the optimiser (or C++11 move semantics) do their job. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '13 at 14:57
    
Actually the Foo& f = makeFoo(); version probably won't compile. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '13 at 14:58
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit why not? –  Luchian Grigore Jan 7 '13 at 14:58
    
@LuchianGrigore: Ref to temporary? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '13 at 14:58
4  
@cls: Any resource that correctly explains move semenatics should enlighten you to its relevance here(try wikipedia: "move semantics"). The whole point is reducing the cost of unnecessary copies. Just make sure your Foo objects are designed to take advantage of it. Mainly, you want to ensure that the object's "largeness" is not in the object itself, but referenced externally. A prime example is std::vector, which internally is just a few pointers. But those pointers can reference huge amounts of data. The vector can be moved by simply copying and nullifying the pointers. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 7 '13 at 15:34

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your first code does a lot of work:

void useFoo() {
    Foo f = makeFoo();  // line 2
    f.doSomething();
}

Thinking of line 2, some interesting things happen. First, the compiler will emit code to construct a Foo object at f using the default constructor of the class. Then, it will call makeFoo(), which also creates a new Foo object and returns a reference to that object. The compiler will also have to emit code that copies the temporary return value of makeFoo() into the object at f, and then it will destroy the temporary object. Once line 2 is done, f.doSomething() is called. But just before useFoo() returns, we destroy the object at f, as well, since it is going out of scope.

Your second code example is much more efficient, but it's actually probably wrong:

void useFoo() {
    Foo& f = makeFoo();   // line 2
    f.doSomething();
}

Thinking of line 2 in that example, we realize that we don't create an object for f since it is just a reference. The makeFoo() function returns an object that it has newly allocated, and we keep a reference to it. We call doSomething() through that reference. But when the useFoo() function returns, we don't ever destroy the new object that makeFoo() created for us and it leaks.

There's a few different ways to fix this. You could just use the reference mechanism you have in your first code fragment, if you don't mind the extra constructors, creation, copying and destruction. (If you have trivial constructors and destructors, and not much (or none) state to copy, then it doesn't matter much.) You could just return a pointer, which has the strong implication that the caller is responsible for managing the life cycle of the referenced object.

If you return a pointer, you've implied that the caller must manage the life cycle of the object, but you haven't enforced it. Someone, someday, somewhere will get it wrong. So you might consider making a wrapper class that manages the reference and provides accessors to encapsulate the management of the objects. (You could even bake that into the Foo class itself, if you wanted to.) A wrapper class of this type is called a "smart pointer" in its generic form. If you're using the STL, you'll find a smart pointer implementation in the std::unique_ptr template class.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree mostly, but you could give a hint so smart pointers in the last paragraph. This would reduce copying costs and also free the object as soon as the smart pointer goes out of scope. –  Skalli Jan 7 '13 at 15:06
    
True, Skalli. I sharpened it up a bit for that. –  MikeB Jan 7 '13 at 15:45
    
Actually, the description of the first useFoo is wrong. The compiler will not emit code to default-construct f. It will just set aside enough memory to copy-construct f with the result from makeFoo. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 7 '13 at 16:07
    
@Bart van Ingen Schenau, is that guaranteed by the standard, or implementation-defined? Or is it dependent on which constructors and operators class foo implements? –  MikeB Jan 7 '13 at 16:32
    
@MikeB: It is guaranteed by the standard that the default constructor won't be used in useFoo. The details when memory gets set aside are up to the implementation. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 7 '13 at 16:39

Yes, the first one will make a copy of the returned reference, while the second will be a reference to the return of makeFoo.

Note that using the first version will result in a memory leak (most likely), unless you do some dark magic inside the copy constructor.

Well, the second will result in a leak as well unless you call delete &f;.

Bottom line: don't. Just follow the crowd and return by value. Or a smart pointer.

share|improve this answer
1  
So I should leave everything as is, just change the return type of makeFoo to Foo instead of Foo&? –  cls Jan 7 '13 at 15:02
    
@cls: You allocate Foo on the stack and return a copy! So no new involved. –  Skalli Jan 7 '13 at 15:03
    
@Skalli What if Foo is a large object and I do not have the memory or time to copy it? –  cls Jan 7 '13 at 15:08
1  
@cls the compiler will probably optimize it away. If you're really concerned, return a std::shared_ptr<Foo>. –  Luchian Grigore Jan 7 '13 at 15:09
    
@cls: Luchian Grigore was faster and he's right: Use a smart pointer. There are several distinct smart pointers you can use each with a focus on a special use-case. std::shared_ptr<Foo> should be the most fitting for your use-case. –  Skalli Jan 7 '13 at 15:11

A function should never return a reference to a new object that gets created. When you are making a new value, you should return a value or a pointer. Returning a value is almost always preferred, since almost any compiler will use RVO/NRVO to get rid of the extra copy.

Returning a value:

Foo makeFoo(){
    Foo f;
    // do something
    return f;
}

// Using it
Foo f = makeFoo();

Returning a pointer:

Foo* makeFoo(){
    std::unique_ptr<Foo> p(new Foo());  // use a smart pointer for exception-safety
    // do something
    return p.release();
}

// Using it
Foo* foo1 = makeFoo();                 // Can do this
std::unique_ptr<Foo> foo2(makeFoo());   // This is better
share|improve this answer
    
For your second example, why not just return a unique_ptr and leave the decision of throwing away the safety to the caller? –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 7 '13 at 15:58
1  
I prefer to leave the decision of how to use it to the caller. Returning a raw pointer lets them put it into any kind of smart pointer they want. You're also less likely to run into ABI issues if the function and the caller aren't compiled against exactly the same version of the standard library. –  Dirk Holsopple Jan 7 '13 at 16:09
    
Returning unique_ptr also allows them to put it into any kind of smart pointer they want(they can call release just as you did in the function), and it's self documenting. When a function returns a raw pointer, I can't make any assumption about what actions need to be taken to ensure that it is managed properly. It may be dynamically allocated with new, or malloc, or it may not need to be managed at all. As for your second point, I can only say I've never personally run into any such issues, but I won't make an argument from incredulity. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 7 '13 at 16:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.