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I have two vectors. "Points" is my original array of points. "Chosen" is a collection of points to be deleted from "Points". I would like take unique ids of points from "Chosen", assign them to iterator and just erase such points. But somehow I can't do it.

Secondly, in the examples I studied I can't understand, how an iterator is linked to a definite vector. Hope with your help I'll understand iterators.

#include <StdAfx.h>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

using namespace std;
struct SPoint
{
    int id;
    int X;
    int Y;
};

vector<SPoint> points;
vector<SPoint> chosen;
vector<SPoint> cleared;

vector<SPoint>::iterator it;

void print_vect(const vector<SPoint> & vect)
{
    for (int i = 0; i < vect.size(); ++i)
    {
        cout << vect[i].id << " (" << vect[i].X << "," << vect[i].Y << ")"<<endl;               
    }           

    cout << endl;   
}
bool compare(double val1, double val2)
{
    return val1 > val2;
}
void sort_points(vector<SPoint> & vect, char command)
{
    bool cmp_result;
    SPoint temp;
    bool sorted=true;
    for (int i = 0; i < vect.size()-1 ; i++)
    {
        sorted=true;
        for (int j = 1; j <= vect.size()-1; j++)
        {
            switch (command) 
            {
                case 'x': 
                    {
                        cmp_result = compare(vect[j-1].X, vect[j].X); 
                        break;
                    }
                case 'y': 
                    {
                        cmp_result = compare(vect[j-1].Y, vect[j].Y); 
                        break;              
                    }               
                case 'i': 
                    {
                        cmp_result = compare(vect[j-1].id, vect[j].id); 
                        break;              
                    }           
            }

            if (cmp_result)
            {
                sorted = false;
                temp = vect[j-1];
                vect[j-1] = vect[j];
                vect[j] = temp;
            }

        }
        if (sorted) 
        {
            cout << "Sorted:" << endl;
            print_vect(vect);           
            break;
        }
    }
}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    SPoint temp;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        temp.id = i;
        temp.X = i;
        temp.Y = i;
        points.push_back(temp);
    }

    for (int i = 5; i < 10; i++)
    {
        temp.id = i;
        temp.X = i;
        temp.Y = i;
        chosen.push_back(temp);
    }

    cout << "Points:" << endl;
    print_vect(points);
    cout << endl << endl;

    cout << "Chosen:" << endl;
    print_vect(chosen);

    system("pause");

    vector<SPoint>::iterator it;
    for (int i = 0;i < chosen.size(); i++)
    {       
        //points.erase(it);
    }   

    print_vect(points);
    system("pause");


    print_vect(cleared);
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
What does somehow I can't do it mean, what is the bug, and where is the minimal code you wrote to reproduce it? –  Useless Jan 7 '13 at 15:09
    
i dont think that iterator is the right way to do that. iterators are for 'iterating' through the collection and do stuff. i think it will go even faster than moving through your vector using vector[i]. –  Zaiborg Jan 7 '13 at 15:13
    
well, it is there vector<SPoint>::iterator it; for (int i = 0;i < chosen.size(); i++). Then uncomment points.erase(it). I understand that if I cope to transfer int to the iterator it, that should work. But didn't manage to do it. –  Kifsif Jan 7 '13 at 15:14
    
// erase the first 3 elements: myvector.erase (myvector.begin(),myvector.begin()+3); so if you want to remove some values in the vector, it would be enough to pass a integer to erase() for specific removal, use something like for (vector<SPoint>::iterator it = chosen.begin(); it != chosen.end(); ++it), compare the value in *it and then do stuff –  Zaiborg Jan 7 '13 at 15:18
    
I love how you use "do stuff" without thinking about possible implications, @Zaiborg –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 7 '13 at 15:23

2 Answers 2

I am going to advise a drasic change: Don't use std::vector here, but use std::map instead, using the point's id as a key and the X/Y coordinates as value:

using namespace std;
struct SPoint
{
    int X;
    int Y;
};

map<int, SPoint> points;
vector<int> chosen; // only keeps chosen id's, not complete points

void print_points(const map<int, SPoint> & points)
{
    for (map<int, SPoint>::const_iterator i = points.begin(); i != points.end(); ++i)
    {
        cout << i->first << " (" << i->second.X << "," << i->second.Y << ")"<<endl;               
    }           

    cout << endl;   
}

int tmain(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    SPoint temp;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
    {
        temp.X = i;
        temp.Y = i;
        points[i] = temp;
    }

    for (int i = 5; i < 10; i++)
    {
        chosen.push_back(i);
    }

    cout << "Points:" << endl;
    print_points(points);
    cout << endl << endl;

    system("pause");

    for (vector<int>::iterator it = chosen.begin(); it != chosen.end(); it++)
    {       
        points.erase(*it); // erase all points with id corresponding to the current value of chosen
    }   

    print_points(points);
    system("pause");
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

In general, modifying the container that's being iterated over is a bad idea. Also note that if Chosen is not sorted, it will work in O(Points.size() * Chosen.size()) (+ reallocations); there's just no way other than comparing every element in Points to every element (until found or end) in Chosen. Thus, it would be a better idea to use set (or, even better, unordered_set) as a container for Chosen. Please also note that if you want to remove elements from the middle of the Points, it will have to do a lot of reallocations, and again, set or list would be a better idea.

You can pass additional predicate to std::sort to sort by a specific field of an object - you don't have to reimplement sort algorithm by yourself.

To check if the vector is sorted, you can use is_sorted method (or, if you are using old compiler, adjacent_find, as in here).

share|improve this answer
    
No, the idea is not like that. Look: id is unique. Then we can iterate through "chosen", just take the id and remove the element with the same id from "points". No iteration through a vector that we are modifying. –  Kifsif Jan 7 '13 at 15:19
    
Uhm, how are you going to "remove the element with the same id from points" without iterating over it? –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 7 '13 at 15:21
    
If you pass an iterator to points.erase, as requested in the question, you are by definition iterating. That's how one acquires an iterator. –  ssube Jan 7 '13 at 15:22
    
Bartek, vector seems to be a linced list. I suppose it is possible to remove an element from such a list. –  Kifsif Jan 7 '13 at 15:31
1  
@Kifsif what you said is totally untrue. std::vector is a contiguos memory array. I'd recommend you pick up a book about C++ standard library first. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 7 '13 at 15:33

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