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In my class I need to store a const static set of strings. As the code being written now in C++ is based on original C algorithms (in part), the data was stored as const char* presets[150] (there are 150 strings). As I am now essentially rewriting/repackaging this in C++, char* became string. My question is: should I change the array to vector?

What's better in this case, const static vector<string> presets or const static string presets[150]?

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If you have C++11 available, std::array<std::string, 150> would be the best option. –  Angew Jan 7 '13 at 15:41
    
Exactly what I was about to say. If not, stick with the vector. –  chris Jan 7 '13 at 15:41
    
@Angew Hm... std::array is defined as template<typename T, int size> struct std::array { T a[size]; }; so what's the advantage of using std::array<std::string, 150> presets over std::string presets[150] (besides just using this syntax). –  Aleks G Jan 7 '13 at 15:48
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I am wondering why the data stored as const char* data[150] has to change at all? –  arrows Jan 7 '13 at 15:53
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@BartekBanachewicz On the other hand, it works, and all of the C++ alternatives have problems. –  James Kanze Jan 7 '13 at 17:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Was it in fact char const* const presets[] = { ... };, initialized with string literals? In other words, when you say char const* presents[150], is this because someone forgot the second const, or is it because you actually modify the pointers later. And is it because someone actually counted the initializers, and put the number in the braces, and you update this number each time you add or remove an initializer, or is it because you provide less initializers, and count on the trailing values being initialized with a nul pointer? Without knowing exactly what you're trying to do, it's difficult giving good recommendations.

In the most frequent case I've encountered, where what you really want is that everything be const, and that the size of the array correspond exactly to the number of initializers, the best solution is probably to just leave it as it is. To get automatic sizing of the array, you need to use either C style arrays, or (and then only with C++11) std::vector; std::array requires you to explicitly give the number of elements. And to get truly static initialization (and thus never have any risk of order of initialization issues), you need either a C style array or std::array, in both cases of char const* (and not std::string, which requires dynamic initialization).

Note that using char const* rather than std::string does mean that each time you access it (typically), you will construct a new std::string. Depending on the implementation, this may introduce some extra runtime overhead. Usually, this is not a problem, but it may be something to consider as well; it has to be weighed against the fact that if you use the object from constructors of other static objects, using std::string will cause order of initialization issues which would have to be addresses.

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And that's why I recommended array<string> instead of array<const char*>. Assuming we aren't on embedded (which, I guess would be tagged appropriately), memory is less of a concern than computing power. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 7 '13 at 16:17
    
+1 for "what you really want is that everything be const, and that the size of the array correspond exactly to the number of initializers, the best solution is probably to just leave it as it is". –  Happy Green Kid Naps Jan 7 '13 at 16:18
    
@BartekBanachewicz The problem remains that std::string does not allow static initialization, and so can cause order of initialization issues. –  James Kanze Jan 7 '13 at 16:19

Certainly not the latter.

If the size doesn't need to change, use

std::array<std::string, 150>

This way you will be able to operate on it in a very similar way to std::vector.

EDIT: Regarding possible problems with string initialization: You can create the array as C-style array, and then copy the data to an array. Since you will be copying contiguos block of (around) 600 bytes, it isn't very expensive operation.

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std::string[] can also use the standard algorithms … –  Konrad Rudolph Jan 7 '13 at 15:42
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@KonradRudolph Still, the array is preferred. The fact C-style arrays can be used with standard algorithms is more for backwards compatibility and ease of integrating old code. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 7 '13 at 15:45
    
Hm... std::array is defined as template<typename T, int size> struct std::array { T a[size]; }; so what's the advantage of using std::array<std::string, 150> presets over std::string presets[150] (besides just using this syntax). –  Aleks G Jan 7 '13 at 15:49
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@AleksG The advantage is that std::array behaves as a proper type whereas raw arrays like to throw away type information at the drop of a hat. Consider: void foo(int arr[10]) {} int main() { int arr[3]; foo(arr); } This does not result in any compile time error because of some awful rules imported from C. –  bames53 Jan 7 '13 at 15:52
    
@BartekBanachewicz Whether std::array is preferred or not depends on the context. If you use std::array, you have to carefully count the initializers, and specify the size as an integral constant. If you use std::string[], the compiler will do this for you, with no chance of error. And unless you're actually passing the full array as an argument to a function, the fact that arrays are broken as a type doesn't matter much. –  James Kanze Jan 7 '13 at 16:16

It depends. If you use a array or vector of std::string you have to deal with initialisation of objects at runtime. If you use your original array everything is initialised at compile time. On the other side it may be usefull to use "real" objects when you need additional functionality like a constant time size() .

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