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I have an application which handles the creation of different shop entities.

The process:
1. User registers to the website
2. User creates a shop (with various attributes)

What I have so far for database tables is:

[USER]  
user_id

[USER_TO_SHOP]  
user_id  
shop_id

[SHOP]  
shop_id

The above design covers the need for 1 user to have many shop entities under their account.
What I want to achieve now, is to have shop entities which are standalone but also have shop entities which are a part of group of shops

Chain of Shops example:
McDonalds Address X Chicago
McDonalds Address X New York
McDonalds Address X Boston

How should I proceed with my database design in order to support chain of shops but also standalone ones? Best practices are really appreciated!

*by standalone I mean a shop entity that does not belong to a chain

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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

From what you're saying, a shop can belong to between 0 and 1 chains? If so, I would simply add one extra table and add a foreign key to the shop table:

[CHAIN]
chain_id
chain_name

[SHOP]
shop_id
chain_id
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And what if the shop doesn t belong to a chain? We keep shop.chan_id to zero ? –  mallix Jan 7 '13 at 16:03
    
Yup, shop.chain_id can be NULL –  MatW Jan 7 '13 at 16:04
    
You could probably eliminate user_to_shop as well with a nullable user_id on the shop table too. –  Eric Petroelje Jan 7 '13 at 16:08
    
You could but in my app when a user registers, a shop profile is simultaneously created in database. I want to alter this trigger, with the selection of creating a standalone shop profile or a chain one. –  mallix Jan 7 '13 at 16:12
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Off the top of my head I'd have a locations table and rename shop to company so single companies go into that table but can have multiple locations. Then users are associated with a company location.

There are many ways to achieve what you want, so, answers will be subjective since we don't really have the whole picture.

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Well, for chains, you could have something like this, just like you have for users:

[CHAIN]
chain_id

[CHAIN_TO_SHOP]
chain_id
shop_id

Not sure what you mean by a standalone shop though - if you mean a shop that isn't owned by a user or a chain, could be something like this:

[STANDALONE_SHOP]
shop_id

But I would question the need for such a table, since a standalone shop could be assumed by an absence of an entry in CHAIN_TO_SHOP or USER_TO_SHOP

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If chains-shops is a 1-many relationship, then adding a pivot table will mean having to use unnecessary joins in your queries –  MatW Jan 7 '13 at 16:03
    
@MatW - Yes, it could, if you always need that information. Your suggestion of using a nullable chain_id is good as well, but this is just the same thing only pulling the chain_id into a separate table (like he has already for user_id) –  Eric Petroelje Jan 7 '13 at 16:09
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