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Currently I am having trouble learning normalization. While I know basic concepts behind 1NF - 3NF, I still do not understand the steps that one needs to follow before normalization.

According to my understanding, one has to first collect base entities, their attributes, relation among the entities and then start normalization. But I do not understand, whether I am supposed to normalize all attributes at once or normalize attributes of the entities that have some sort of relation with each other.

Considering an example of a store.

store(name, address, contact)
customer(sn, name, address)
item(id, name, price)
transaction(id, date, customer_sn, item_id, quantity, total_price)

According to my understanding I would either try to normalize all attributes at once or normalize attributes of only customer, item and transaction.

I know I am missing something, I just cannot figure it out.

Any help is appreciated. Thanks for your valuable time.

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Almost everything in the answer you accepted is simply wrong. –  Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jan 10 '13 at 11:20
    
@Catchall: You are right about the 2.NF, but telling Almost everything is wrong is preposterous, and your listing of values one might add to a store is not what was asked in the question and does not help anyone. But I deleted my answer because I don`t want to be downvoted because of your ridiculous comment and your apparent inability to understand it combined with a much higher reputation. I don`t think the user accepted because it didn`t help him. –  Nic Jan 10 '13 at 15:44

1 Answer 1

According to my understanding, one has to first collect base entities, their attributes, relation among the entities and then start normalization.

No, you don't have to do that. And in fact it's often hard, if not impossible, to even identify some base entities before you start normalizing.

At the logical level, you start by collecting all the attributes you need, and you put them in one big relation. You will find smaller examples of this in virtually every textbook about database systems.

After you collect all the required attributes, determine the dependencies among them.

For a store, you might collect these attributes.

  • A. store name
  • B. store physical address
  • C. item sku
  • D. item name
  • E. item price
  • F. transaction timestamp
  • G. transaction type (as "Purchase", "Return", "Store Credit", etc.)
  • H. transaction register (which machine performed the transaction)
  • I. transaction cashier (which employee performed the transaction)
  • J. transaction item sku
  • K. transaction item price
  • L. transaction item quantity
  • M. transaction item extended price
  • N. transaction item sales tax
  • O. transaction total
  • P. transaction payment type (cash, check, credit card)
  • Q. transaction payment amount

Following that, you might determine that these functional dependencies apply.

  • A->B
  • B->A
  • C->D
  • C->E
  • FH->GI
  • FH->O
  • J->K
  • FHJ->L
  • KL->M
  • KL->N
  • M->N

This is where you start normalizing. Each time you decompose one relation to raise it to a higher normal form, you add another relation. Each time you add another relation, you apply all the principles of normalization to it, too. The process is recursive.

Good CASE tools can generate every possible 5NF decomposition based on that list of dependencies.

Other design decisions are also important, but might have nothing to do with normalization.

For example, one design project might decide to store only one phone number per person. Another project might decide to store several phone numbers for each person. That kind of decision is important, but it has nothing to do with normalization. That is, storing one phone number per person doesn't violate any normal form, and neither does storing multiple phone numbers per person.

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