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I am creating a video player which relies on loading both the vimeo and youtube playlist apis through ajax. Once they are loaded, for youtube I then need to loop through all the videos in the playlist and call the data api for each video to get its modified date. Once all vimeo videos are loaded and all youtube videos are loaded and have their creation dates, I need to sort them using jquery.

I'm looking for the best way to detect when these processes have been done, and the problem is I can't really start the sort until both the vimeo functions and the youtube functions have been completed. The best thing I could come up with was to run a setInterval function which checks on the status of two boolean flags - for example:

var youtubeReady = false, vimeoReady = false;
var videoStatusInterval = setInterval("checkVideoStatus",1000);

function checkVideoStatus(){
  if (youtubeReady === true && vimeoReady === true){
    sortVideos();
  }
}

The problem is that this would run only periodically (every second in the example) - and it seems like there should be a way to do this instantaneously once both conditions are met. Anyone have any ideas?

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2  
Just a tip, don't use strings in setInterval. Just pass a reference to the function setInterval(checkVideoStatus, 1000); You can also make it more "instantaneous" by reducing the interval time. –  Chad Jan 7 '13 at 16:16
    
There should be some kind of event that is fired by either API to let you know it's ready. Without knowing much else about your code I would say check into events you can subscribe to. Then setup callbacks for those events that will fire your sort function. –  sethetter Jan 7 '13 at 16:20
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am not familiar with Youtube's API nor Vimeo, but maybe they have a 'ready', 'done' or 'loaded' event that you can listen two, then, in the handler that you set, you set the two flags, so that, if both are true, then you execute, something like this:

    //Let's createa a couple of custome events to simulate the real ones, comming from Youtube and Vimeo.
var youtube = document.createEvent('Event'),
    vimeo  = document.createEvent('Event');

youtube.initEvent('youtubeReady');
vimeo.initEvent('vimeoReady');

/*
* This function will be use to run YOUR code, ONCE BOTH events are triggered.
* As said, functions are objects so, as any object in JS, you can add fields at any time you want.
* Check this page in Mozilla's Developer Network for more detail:  http://goo.gl/Pdvpk */
function sourcesReady(){
  if(sourcesReady.youtube && sourcesReady.vimeo){
        alert('Both sources ready!');
  }
  else if(sourcesReady.youtube){ 
    alert('Only Youtube ready!');
  }
  else if(sourcesReady.vimeo){ 
    alert('Only Vimeo ready!');
  }
}

//Let's set a couple of event handlers for the 'ready' events, these handlers will set the flags that we need.
document.addEventListener('youtubeReady', function youtubeReadyHandler(){
  sourcesReady.youtube = true; //We set/create the field in the function, that is, the function ITSELF has the field, not the 'this'.
  sourcesReady(); //We call it to evaluate the condition.
}, true);

document.addEventListener('vimeoReady', function vimeoReadyHandler(){
  sourcesReady.vimeo = true; //same as before.
  sourcesReady(); //We call it to evaluate the condition.
}, true);

document.dispatchEvent(youtube);
document.dispatchEvent(vimeo);

Hope this suggestion helps. =)

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But does setting a function's property re-execute it? You would want to add an explicit call to the sourcesReady() function in each event subscription as well. This would accomodate for either one completing before the other. –  sethetter Jan 7 '13 at 16:22
    
Yes - I was going to ask the same thing. Wouldn't you need to say sourcesReady.vimeo = true; sourcesReady(); –  mheavers Jan 7 '13 at 16:24
    
I forgot yo added but, after setting the variables in the function object you will call it, that way, the condition gets checked, if it is not fulfill, it will be next time. –  Hugo Jan 7 '13 at 16:25
    
Can you revise your answer so I can see how this is structured Hugo? I'm not sure I really follow, and I'm not familiar with using a function as an object –  mheavers Jan 7 '13 at 17:00
    
Updated the code, hopefully it be clear this way =D –  Hugo Jan 7 '13 at 17:28
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Even though these actions are being done asynchronously, you can still create global variables.

var youTubeScanDone = false, vimeoScanDone = false;

Then set these variables to true when they are done. Create a function function sortVideoList() { ... }, and at the end of each scan call a line like this

if (youTubeScanDone && viemoScanDone) sortVideoList();

Just make sure to set the booleans to true before calling this line (depending on which scan function you're in.

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I think that is what he is doing right now. –  Chad Jan 7 '13 at 16:22
    
Hmmm... He said he was using a setInterval. I'm saying forget the setInterval, just conditionally call the sort routine from the end of the scan routines. –  jwatts1980 Jan 7 '13 at 16:24
    
I get what you are saying, do the same thing but do the check at the end of each of the API calls. –  Chad Jan 7 '13 at 16:36
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