Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm writing some code that looks like this:

while(true) {
    switch(msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE: // ... 
        break;
    // ... more stuff ...
    case DONE:
        break; // **HERE, I want to break out of the loop itself**
    }
}

Is there any direct way to do that?

I know I can use a flag, and break from the loop by putting a conditional break just after the switch. I just want to know if C++ has some construct for this already.

share|improve this question
15  
Why do you need a conditional break after the switch? Just change your while from while(true) to while(flag)... –  Tal Pressman Sep 14 '09 at 7:02
1  
@Dave_Jarvis I assume that this is a simplified version that he has put in here to illustrate what he was trying to do. –  Alterlife Sep 14 '09 at 7:50
2  
If you are one of these programmers that produce functions which are several pages long, you'll find goto appealing and, sometimes, the only clean way out. If you tend to organize your code into small functions which are only a few lines long and do one single thing each, you will never run into this problem. (Incidentally your code will be easier to read, too.) –  sbi Sep 14 '09 at 9:40
5  
If feels like getting an advice to quit smoking when all you want to know is how to get to the nearest subway station. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 14 '09 at 9:54
3  
@hacker: Well, if you can't see the subway station in front of you due to all the smoke, that advice might not be all that bad. :) –  sbi Sep 15 '09 at 12:34
show 4 more comments

17 Answers

up vote 42 down vote accepted

Premise

The following code should be considered bad form, regardless of language or desired functionality:

while( true ) {
}

Supporting Arguments

The while( true ) loop is poor form because it:

  • Breaks the implied contract of a while loop.
    • The while loop declaration should explicitly state the only exit condition.
  • Implies that it loops forever.
    • Code within the loop must be read to understand the terminating clause.
    • Loops that repeat forever prevent the user from terminating the program from within the program.
  • Is inefficient.
    • There are multiple loop termination conditions, including checking for "true".
  • Is prone to bugs.
    • Cannot easily determine where to put code that will always execute for each iteration.
  • Leads to unnecessarily complex code.

Alternative to "Go To"

The following code is better form:

while( isValidState() ) {
  execute();
}

bool isValidState() {
  return msg->state != DONE;
}

Advantages

No flag. No goto. No exception. Easy to change. Easy to read. Easy to fix. Additionally the code:

  1. Isolates the knowledge of the loop's workload from the loop itself.
  2. Allows someone maintaining the code to easily extend the functionality.
  3. Allows multiple terminating conditions to be assigned in one place.
  4. Separates the terminating clause from the code to execute.
  5. Is safer for Nuclear Power plants. ;-)

The second point is important. Without knowing how the code works, if someone asked me to make the main loop let other threads (or processes) have some CPU time, two solutions come to mind:

Option #1

Readily insert the pause:

while( isValidState() ) {
  execute();
  sleep();
}

Option #2

Override execute:

void execute() {
  super->execute();
  sleep();
}

This code is simpler (thus easier to read) than a loop with an embedded switch. The isValidState method should only determine if the loop should continue. The workhorse of the method should be abstracted into the execute method, which allows subclasses to override the default behaviour (a difficult task using an embedded switch and goto).

Python Example

Contrast the following answer (to a Python question) that was posted on StackOverflow:

  1. Loop forever.
  2. Ask the user to input their choice.
  3. If the user's input is 'restart', continue looping forever.
  4. Otherwise, stop looping forever.
  5. End.
Code
while True: 
    choice = raw_input('What do you want? ')

    if choice == 'restart':
        continue
    else:
        break

print 'Break!' 

Versus:

  1. Initialize the user's choice.
  2. Loop while the user's choice is the word 'restart'.
  3. Ask the user to input their choice.
  4. End.
Code
choice = 'restart';

while choice == 'restart': 
    choice = raw_input('What do you want? ')

print 'Break!'

Here, while True results in misleading and overly complex code.

share|improve this answer
19  
“Considered Harmful” Essays Considered Harmful - meyerweb.com/eric/comment/chech.html –  Kobi Sep 14 '09 at 7:40
8  
The idea that while(true) should be harmful seems bizarre to me. There's loops that check before they execute, there's those that check afterwards, and there's those that check in the middle. Since the latter don't have syntactic construct in C and C++, you'll have to use while(true) or for(;;). If you consider this wrong, you haven't given enough thought to the different kind of loops yet. –  sbi Sep 14 '09 at 9:37
12  
Reasons why I disagree: while(true) and for(;;;) are not confusing (unlike do{}while(true)) because they state what they're doing right up front. It is actually easier to look for "break" statements than parse an arbitrary loop condition and look for where it's set, and no harder to prove correctness. The argument about where to put code is just as intractable in the presence of a continue statement, and not much better with if statements. The efficiency argument is positively silly. –  David Thornley Sep 14 '09 at 17:15
5  
Whenever you see "while(true)", you can think of a loop that has internal termination conditions, which are no harder than arbitrary end conditions. Simply, a "while(foo)" loop, where foo is a boolean variable set in an arbitrary way, is no better than "while(true)" with breaks. You have to look through the code in both cases. Putting forth a silly reason (and microefficiency is a silly argument) doesn't help your case, by the way. –  David Thornley Sep 14 '09 at 17:49
2  
@Dave: I gave a reason: It's the only way to get a loop that checks the condition in the middle. Classic example: while(true) {string line; std::getline(is,line); if(!is) break; lines.push_back(line);} Of course I could transform this to a preconditioned loop (using std::getline as the loop condition), but this has disadvantages on its own (line would have to be a variable outside the loop's scope). And if I did, I would have to ask: Why do we have three loops anyway? We could always transform everything into a preconditioned loop. Use what fits best. If while(true) fits, then use it. –  sbi Sep 15 '09 at 9:07
show 5 more comments

You can use goto.

while ( ... ) {
   switch( ... ) {
     case ...:
         goto exit_loop;

   }
}
exit_loop: ;
share|improve this answer
8  
Just don't go wild with that keyword. –  Fragsworth Sep 14 '09 at 6:56
21  
It's funny I get downvoted because people don't like goto. The OP clearly mentioned without using flags. Can you suggest a better way, considering the OP's limitation? :) –  LeakyCode Sep 14 '09 at 6:57
8  
upvoted just t to compensate mindless goto haters. I guess Mehrdad knew he's going to lose a couple of points for suggesting sensible solution here. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 14 '09 at 7:17
4  
+1. I understand this is more of a theoretical than a practical question; it clearly asks for a jump instruction. Given that break, continue and return are unsuitable, the only answer is the general jump: goto. This said, while (flag) would be a superior construct, but not what the OP asked for. –  Gorpik Sep 14 '09 at 7:18
3  
+1, there is no better way imho, even when considering the OPs limitations. Flags are ugly, break up logic across the whole loop and thus more difficult to grasp. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 14 '09 at 17:46
show 7 more comments

An alternate solution is to use the keyword continue in combination with break, i.e.:

for (;;) {
    switch(msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE
        // code
        continue; // continue with loop
    case DONE:
        break;
    }
    break;
}

Use the continue statement to finish each case label where you want the loop to continue and use the break statement to finish case labels that should terminate the loop.

Of course this solution only works if there is no additional code to execute after the switch statement.

share|improve this answer
2  
While this is indeed very elegant, it has the disadvantage that most developers first have to look at it for a minute in order to understand how/whether this works. :( –  sbi Sep 15 '09 at 12:27
    
The last sentence is what makes this not so great :( Otherwise a very clean implementation. –  nawfal Oct 15 '13 at 10:11
add comment

A neatish way to do this would be to put this into a function:

int yourfunc() {

    while(true) {

        switch(msg->state) {
        case MSGTYPE: // ... 
            break;
        // ... more stuff ...
        case DONE:
            return; 
        }

    }
}

Optionally (but 'bad practices'): as already suggested you could use a goto, or throw an exception inside the switch.

share|improve this answer
3  
Exception should be used to, well, throw an exception, not a well know behavior of a function. –  Clement Herreman Sep 14 '09 at 7:04
    
I agree with Afterlife: Put it in a function. –  dalle Sep 14 '09 at 7:06
8  
Throwing an exception is really evil in this case. It means "I want to use a goto, but I read somewhere that I should not use them, so I'll go with a subterfuge and pretend to look smart". –  Gorpik Sep 14 '09 at 7:07
    
No. while(true) is the culprit; breaking out of the loop anywhere other than the condition of the while loop is poor style. –  Dave Jarvis Sep 14 '09 at 7:26
    
I agree that throwing an exception or using a goto is a terrible idea, but they are working options and have been listed as such in my answer. –  Alterlife Sep 14 '09 at 7:53
show 1 more comment

AFAIK there is no "double break" or similar construct in C++. The closest would be a goto - which, while it has a bad connotation to its name, exists in the language for a reason - as long as it's used carefully and sparingly, it's a viable option.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could put your switch into a separate function like this:

bool myswitchfunction()
{
    switch(msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE: // ... 
        break;
    // ... more stuff ...
    case DONE:
        return false; // **HERE, I want to break out of the loop itself**
    }
    return true;
}

while(myswitchfunction())
    ;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Even if you don't like goto, do not use an exception to exit a loop. The following sample shows how ugly it could be:

try {
  while ( ... ) {
    switch( ... ) {
      case ...:
        throw 777; // I'm afraid of goto
     }
  }
}
catch ( int )
{
}

I would use goto as in this answer. In this case goto will make code more clear then any other option. I hope that this question will be helpful.

But I think that using goto is the only option here because of the string while(true). You should consider refactoring of your loop. I'd suppose the following solution:

bool end_loop = false;
while ( !end_loop ) {
    switch( msg->state ) {
    case MSGTYPE: // ... 
        break;
    // ... more stuff ...
    case DONE:
        end_loop = true; break;
    }
}

Or even the following:

while ( msg->state != DONE ) {
    switch( msg->state ) {
    case MSGTYPE: // ... 
        break;
    // ... more stuff ...
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Yeah, but I like exceptions even less ;-) –  quamrana Sep 14 '09 at 7:20
2  
Using an exception to emulate a goto is of course worse than actually using a goto! It will probably also be significantly slower. –  therefromhere Sep 14 '09 at 7:22
2  
@Downvoter: It is because I state, that you shouldn't use exception, or because I suggest refactoring? –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 14 '09 at 7:29
1  
Not the down-voter - but... Your answer isn't clear whether you are proposing or condemning the idea of using an exception to exit the loop. Maybe the first sentence should be: "Even if you don't like goto, do not use an exception to exit a loop:"? –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 14 '09 at 7:50
1  
@Jonathan Leffler, Thanks, you showed the sample of valuable comment. updated the answer keeping in mind your comments. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Sep 14 '09 at 8:42
add comment

There's no C++ construct for breaking out of the loop in this case.

Either use a flag to interrupt the loop or (if appropriate) extract your code into a function and use return.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could potentially use goto, but I would prefer to set a flag that stops the loop. Then break out of the switch.

share|improve this answer
add comment

The simplest way to do it is to put a simple IF before you do the SWITCH , and that IF test your condition for exiting the loop .......... as simple as it can be

share|improve this answer
1  
Um... you could be even simpler by putting that condition in the while argument. I mean that's what it's there for! :) –  MarqueIV May 4 '11 at 8:01
add comment

The break keyword in C++ only terminates the most-nested enclosing iteration or switch statement. Thus, you couldn't break out of the while (true) loop directly within the switch statement; however you could use the following code, which I think is an excellent pattern for this type of problem:

for (; msg->state != DONE; msg = next_message()) {
    switch (msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE:
        //...
        break;

    //...
    }
}

If you needed to do something when msg->state equals DONE (such as run a cleanup routine), then place that code immediately after the for loop; i.e. if you currently have:

while (true) {
    switch (msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE:
        //... 
        break;

    //...

    case DONE:
        do_cleanup();
        break;
    }

    if (msg->state == DONE)
        break;

    msg = next_message();
}

Then use instead:

for (; msg->state != DONE; msg = next_message()) {
    switch (msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE:
        //...
        break;

    //...
    }
}

assert(msg->state == DONE);
do_cleanup();
share|improve this answer
add comment

It amazes me how simple this is considering the depth of explanations... Here's all you need...

bool imLoopin = true;

while(imLoopin) {

    switch(msg->state) {

        case MSGTYPE: // ... 
            break;

        // ... more stuff ...

        case DONE:
            imLoopin = false;
            break;

    }

}

LOL!! Really! That's all you need! One extra variable!

share|improve this answer
add comment
while(MyCondition) {
switch(msg->state) {
case MSGTYPE: // ... 
    break;
// ... more stuff ...
case DONE:
   MyCondition=false; // just add this code and you will be out of loop.
    break; // **HERE, you want to break out of the loop itself**
}
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Why not just fix the condition in your while loop, causing the problem to disappear?

while(msg->state != DONE)
{
    switch(msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE: // ... 
        break;
    // ... more stuff ...
    case DONE:
        // We can't get here, but for completeness we list it.
        break; // **HERE, I want to break out of the loop itself**
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

I think;

while(msg->state != mExit) 
{
    switch(msg->state) 
    {
      case MSGTYPE: // ...
         break;
      case DONE:
      //  .. 
      //  ..
      msg->state =mExit;
      break;
    }
}
if (msg->state ==mExit)
     msg->state =DONE;
share|improve this answer
add comment

If I remember C++ syntax well, you can add a label to break statements, just like for goto. So what you want would be easily written:

while(true) {
    switch(msg->state) {
    case MSGTYPE: // ...
        break;
    // ... more stuff ...
    case DONE:
        break outofloop; // **HERE, I want to break out of the loop itself**
    }
}

outofloop:
// rest of your code here
share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately, your memory is faulty. It would be a nice feature, on those rare occasions where it would be useful. (I've seen proposals for number of levels to break from, but those look to me like bugs waiting to happen.) –  David Thornley Sep 14 '09 at 20:10
    
That must have been Java, then. Thanks for answering. And, of course, you're right with the rest, too. –  Andrei Vajna II Sep 14 '09 at 20:31
add comment
  while(true)
  {
    switch(x)
    {
     case 1:
     {
      break;
     }
    break;
   case 2:
    //some code here
   break;
  default:
  //some code here
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
All the breaks in that code sample break out of the switch statement. –  Dan Hulme Oct 28 '12 at 12:44
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.