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I have the following:

class HP_Utils {
/**********************************************************************/
public static function getAction()
/**********************************************************************/
{
  if( isset( $_GET[ 'action' ] ) ) {
    return $_GET[ 'action' ];
  }
  else if ( isset( $_POST[ 'action' ] )) {
    return $_POST[ 'action' ];
  }
}
/**********************************************************************/
}

Then in other class:

$this->utils = $this->load( 'helper', 'Utils' );
$action = $this->utils::getAction(); <============== ERROR

The loader:

abstract class MController {
/**********************************************************************/
protected function load( $type, $className ) {
  switch( $type ) {
    case 'model':
      $name = 'MD_' . $className;
      break;
    case 'view':
      $name = 'VW_' . $className;
      break;
    case 'helper';
      $name = 'HP_' . $className;
      break;
  }
  $path = $type . '/' . $name . '.php';
  include( $path );
  return new $name;
}

Gives me error:

PHP Parse error: syntax error, unexpected '::' (T_PAAMAYIM_NEKUDOTAYIM) in /home/jorgee/www/menu/controller/CT_Menu.php on line 11

Obviously i'm badly accesing the static method but I thought that was the way, any help?

share|improve this question
    
Why are trying to store a static class into a variable? Static methods can be access globally without an instance with ClassName::methodName(). –  Sofffia Jan 7 '13 at 17:30
    
Your loader instantiates the util class object, why not just access it as a regular method call $this->util->getAction(); (which is perfectly ok even though it's a static, it can also be called as an instance method) –  Crisp Jan 7 '13 at 17:33
    
@Crisp it's not perfectly valid at all. It's contrary to all OOP principles, and only possible because PHP allows it, as its OOP functionnalities were once weak, and now they keep the BC –  Clement Herreman Jan 7 '13 at 19:10
    
@ClementHerreman understood, I meant perfectly ok simply from a PHP interpreter standpoint. –  Crisp Jan 7 '13 at 19:18
    
@ClementHerreman Sorry to harp back to this Clement, but you mention deprecation errors in your other comment, but there are none, at least as of php5.4.9, and indeed the man page for static keyword says A property declared as static can not be accessed with an instantiated class object (**though a static method can**). No mention there of an impending deprecation of that functionality. –  Crisp Jan 7 '13 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

$this->load() return an object, not a class. Thus when calling $this->utils::getAction(), you get an error.

I'd say use the class name directly, HP_Utils::getAction(), but if you need it to be dynamic, you can use call_user_func :

abstract class MController {
/**********************************************************************/
protected function load( $type, $className ) {
  switch( $type ) {
    case 'model':
      $name = 'MD_' . $className;
      break;
    case 'view':
      $name = 'VW_' . $className;
      break;
    case 'helper';
      $name = 'HP_' . $className;
      break;
  }
  $path = $type . '/' . $name . '.php';
  include( $path );
  return $name;
}

//The actual calling code :
$this->utils = $this->load( 'helper', 'Utils' );
$action = call_user_func($this->utils . '::getAction()');

Please note that this is a very ugly way to call some method. You should question yourself whether you have a design problem here.

share|improve this answer

The right way would be to replace this:

$action = $this->utils::getAction(); <============== ERROR

with this:

$action = HP_Utils::getAction();

I believe you can also call a static method in PHP as if it was an instance method, like so:

$action = $this->utils->getAction();

but the first version is generally better as it makes it very clear that you are in fact calling a static method and not an instance method.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a reason why I can't call the static method from the instance? (Maybe OOP basic theory :P) –  Jorge Jan 7 '13 at 17:31
    
@Jorge - just edited my answer - I believe you can actually do that in PHP, or at least you could in some older versions. –  Eric Petroelje Jan 7 '13 at 17:33
    
@Jorge indeed, basic OOP theory. Static method, are - as their name tell - class-wide, not object-wide, so you call them from the class. PHP tolerate this because of some old BC from PHP 4.x, but you should use it. I believe this will raise some deprecation errors –  Clement Herreman Jan 7 '13 at 17:33

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