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I'm currently trying to build a program that calculates a value, and outputs those values into a text file. On compilation, I am receiving the following error:

'ISO C90 forbids mixed decelerations and code'

My compiler is Quincy 2005, and it is flagging line 11 (int f=10;) as the issue:

#include <stdio.h>


int main()

{

FILE *output;
output = fopen("inductor.txt","a+");

int f=10;
float l, ir, realir;

printf("What is your inductor value (mH)\n");
scanf("%f", &l);

  while (f< 10000000){
  ir=((2*3.141)*f*l);
  realir = ir/1000;

  printf("If Frequency = %d Hz" ,f);
  printf(" Inductive reactance= %f Ohms\n",realir);

  fprintf(output, "%d Hz : %f Ohms\n ", f, realir);


 f=f*10;

 }

fclose(output);

return 0;
}

Annoyingly, changing compiler is not an option.

share|improve this question
1  
Was the error message unclear to you? It says exactly what the problem is. And you're saying you can't change the compiler, but it sounds like your compiler does support mixed declarations and code, you just need to switch it to another mode (probably C99). –  svick Jan 7 '13 at 17:53
    
Note: "decelerations" != "declarations". –  kevinsa5 Aug 5 '13 at 23:33

3 Answers 3

I believe it's saying you need to declare all variables first, then code.

E.g.:

FILE *output;
int f=10;
float l, ir, realir;


output = fopen("inductor.txt","a+");
printf("What is your inductor value (mH)\n");
share|improve this answer

Move output = fopen("inductor.txt","a+"); down to below the other variable declarations. You have to first declare all variables, and then use them.

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According to previous answers there are 2 ways to negate this since ISO C90 doesn't allow mixed variable declaration and code. One way is already mentioned: Move the variables declaration as suggested.

FILE *output;
int f=10;
float l, ir, realir;
output = fopen("inductor.txt","a+");
// More code

There is also another way. According to ISO C90 you can only declare a variable within code after a block open {. Since you are free to introduce code blocks whenever you want you can simply start a block and put the code in there if you don't want to alter your code much. Please note that variables declared this way are only valid within the block containing them. I strongly recommend the first option.

FILE *output;
output = fopen("inductor.txt","a+");
{
int f=10;
float l, ir, realir;
// More code on this variables.
}
// Variables declared in the block previously will not be valid here.
share|improve this answer
    
In option two, the variables are only valid inside the {} block. So it will not work. –  Erik Ekman Jan 7 '13 at 17:54
    
Yea, thank you about this. I edited my question to reflect this. –  Theocharis K. Jan 7 '13 at 17:59

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