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Say I want to do this:

function z(){return function(){a = 4}
}

function b(){
 var a;
 c = z();
 c();
}

I want to skip the c(); But instead I want to execute the returned function immediatly upon return in the caller scope so I can work with it.

In this example a should get the value 4.

Is there a way? cheers

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1  
b() throws an Error "'a' is not a function" –  Bergi Jan 7 '13 at 17:45
    
sorry too hasty of me. –  Heinrich Jan 7 '13 at 17:46
    
What exactly do you mean? What scope should change? Btw, you don't need the c variable, you can just do a()(). –  Bergi Jan 7 '13 at 17:47
    
a should change to 4. The function should execute in the scope of b(), which it does not when I use z()(). Already tried that before asking ;) –  Heinrich Jan 7 '13 at 17:55
    
Thanks for your edits, now your question is clear. Please note that your problem actually has nothing to do with the closure, and that you do not have a self-executing function anywhere. –  Bergi Jan 7 '13 at 20:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, that is impossible (without using tricks like eval). You cannot change the scope of the function returned by z.

Your example could be simpler without the closure, what you are asking for is just

function c() {
    a = 4;
}
function b() {
    var a;
    c(); // should change variable a
    return a;
}
b(); // is expected to return 4, but does not

You can't alter the scopes of functions, or pass the scope objects (like pointers to the variables). Yet, you can pass an object whose properties will be altered by the function:

function z(obj) {
    return function() {
        obj.a = 4;
    };
}
function b() {
    var o = {};
    z(o)(); // as mike and others said, this is the same as yours
            // - you don't need the c variable
    return o.a;
}
b(); // returns 4 now

escaparello did a similar thing, only he did use the object as the thisValue which he did pass to the anonymous function, not to z. I think mine is easier to understand, and makes a better use of the z closure.

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You should be able to execute the return function immediately with

z()();
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I want to access the caller scope's var's in the returned function. Usually you would just pass it from the caller scope to the callee scope, but I'm wondering if there is another way. –  Heinrich Jan 7 '13 at 17:51
    
@Heinrich scope is determined by the lexical context where the function is defined. You can't "relocate" a function, so what you've asked in your comment here is not possible in JavaScript. –  Pointy Jan 7 '13 at 17:55
    
Thanks. Sad to hear it though. I wanted to extend the angular HTTP request with a possibility to cache requests in a clientside-JS DB. So there would be 2 possible values for a variable. My Idea was to return a self invoking function to first set the var to the cached value and later change it to the value from the backend whilst updating the according value in the DB. That would be my best bet till now :D –  Heinrich Jan 7 '13 at 18:01

Seems very strange, but you want to do something like this?

function z(){
    return function() {
        this.a = 4;
        return this;
    }
}

function b(){
    var obj = { a : 0 };
    var c = z().apply(obj);
    console.log(c.a);
}

b();
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That could work. I have to try it out. But maybe I just have to go with the established way and pass my obj as a param :(. If you are (legitimately) asking yourself why I want this crazy set up, check out my comment above. It would be my best bet on solving an angular extension. –  Heinrich Jan 7 '13 at 18:09
    
Quick question -- Why the return this in the return value of z? –  mike Jan 7 '13 at 18:52
    
@mike: obj === c is the thisVal of the anonymous function –  Bergi Jan 7 '13 at 20:31
    
@Bergi: I think there's no need to return this or the c var... just function z() {return function() {this.a = 4}}. After z().apply(obj); then obj.a === 4, or am I missing something? –  mike Jan 7 '13 at 22:13
    
@Bergi: And I just read your answer -- Nicely done! –  mike Jan 7 '13 at 22:15

Try this

function z(){
    return function(){ 
        return 4;
    }
}

function b(){
    var a;
    a = z()();
}
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