Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an (almost) dedicated system which I'm using for some database stuff. My problem is: A Java application is running pretty slow (taking 2-3 days to complete a task), and I don't know why.

The system is a Xubuntu 12.04.1 LTS, 3.2.0-32-generic x86_64, mySQL 5.5.28, Phenom X2 550, 16 GB RAM and an Intel SSD 520 (utilizing a SandForce processor known for high IOPS).

First, the CPU load is never really at 100%. The htop output looks like this most of the time:

  1  : 63.9% sys: 12.9% low:  0.0%        Tasks: 99, 164 thr; 2 running
  2  : 18.5% sys: 21.2% low:  0.7%        Load average: 1.14 1.23 1.22
  Mem[|||||||||||||||||13490/16049MB]     Uptime: 1 day, 06:32:13
  Swp:8188M used:195M                     Time: 18:33:04

  PID USER      PRI  NI  VIRT   RES   SHR S CPU% MEM%   TIME+  Command
16168 micha      20   0 5163M 1595M  4500 S 75.0  9.9 11h36:10 java -jar ./build
16169 micha      20   0 5163M 1595M  4500 R 75.0  9.9 11h31:34 java -jar ./build
 5968 mysql      20   0 11.9G 10.7G  3992 S 31.0 68.4 13h21:10 /usr/sbin/mysqld
 6142 mysql      20   0 11.9G 10.7G  3992 S 31.0 68.4 10h44:50 /usr/sbin/mysqld

Sometimes also mysqld has a higher CPU usage than java, but it never get's close to 100% on both cores.

The database I'm working on is rather big, with a total of 24 GB of InnoDB tables. Every table has a PRIMARY key and I also used EXPLAIN to get my indexes right. The java tool does rather simple stuff, but tons of it. The tables involved have around 10-20M rows and the java application is doing a magnitude more of queries (SELECT, UPDATE and INSERT). I'm using prepared statements.

These are my settings for InnoDB:

mysql> show variables like 'innodb%'
    -> ;
+---------------------------------+------------------------+
| Variable_name                   | Value                  |
+---------------------------------+------------------------+
| innodb_adaptive_flushing        | ON                     |
| innodb_adaptive_hash_index      | ON                     |
| innodb_additional_mem_pool_size | 8388608                |
| innodb_autoextend_increment     | 8                      |
| innodb_autoinc_lock_mode        | 1                      |
| innodb_buffer_pool_instances    | 1                      |
| innodb_buffer_pool_size         | 10737418240            |
| innodb_change_buffering         | all                    |
| innodb_checksums                | ON                     |
| innodb_commit_concurrency       | 0                      |
| innodb_concurrency_tickets      | 500                    |
| innodb_data_file_path           | ibdata1:10M:autoextend |
| innodb_data_home_dir            |                        |
| innodb_doublewrite              | ON                     |
| innodb_fast_shutdown            | 1                      |
| innodb_file_format              | Antelope               |
| innodb_file_format_check        | ON                     |
| innodb_file_format_max          | Antelope               |
| innodb_file_per_table           | OFF                    |
| innodb_flush_log_at_trx_commit  | 0                      |
| innodb_flush_method             |                        |
| innodb_force_load_corrupted     | OFF                    |
| innodb_force_recovery           | 0                      |
| innodb_io_capacity              | 200                    |
| innodb_large_prefix             | OFF                    |
| innodb_lock_wait_timeout        | 50                     |
| innodb_locks_unsafe_for_binlog  | OFF                    |
| innodb_log_buffer_size          | 8388608                |
| innodb_log_file_size            | 5242880                |
| innodb_log_files_in_group       | 2                      |
| innodb_log_group_home_dir       | ./                     |
| innodb_max_dirty_pages_pct      | 75                     |
| innodb_max_purge_lag            | 0                      |
| innodb_mirrored_log_groups      | 1                      |
| innodb_old_blocks_pct           | 37                     |
| innodb_old_blocks_time          | 0                      |
| innodb_open_files               | 300                    |
| innodb_purge_batch_size         | 20                     |
| innodb_purge_threads            | 0                      |
| innodb_random_read_ahead        | OFF                    |
| innodb_read_ahead_threshold     | 56                     |
| innodb_read_io_threads          | 4                      |
| innodb_replication_delay        | 0                      |
| innodb_rollback_on_timeout      | OFF                    |
| innodb_rollback_segments        | 128                    |
| innodb_spin_wait_delay          | 6                      |
| innodb_stats_method             | nulls_equal            |
| innodb_stats_on_metadata        | ON                     |
| innodb_stats_sample_pages       | 8                      |
| innodb_strict_mode              | OFF                    |
| innodb_support_xa               | ON                     |
| innodb_sync_spin_loops          | 30                     |
| innodb_table_locks              | ON                     |
| innodb_thread_concurrency       | 0                      |
| innodb_thread_sleep_delay       | 10000                  |
| innodb_use_native_aio           | OFF                    |
| innodb_use_sys_malloc           | ON                     |
| innodb_version                  | 1.1.8                  |
| innodb_write_io_threads         | 4                      |
+---------------------------------+------------------------+
59 rows in set (0.01 sec)

Finally, when looking at iotop, the disk hovers at around 1% usage, so I think mySQL actually works only in/with system memory most of the time and does not thrash the disk. I think this excludes RAM and SSD as bottleneck and only leaves the CPU.

But before investing in a new CPU, I would like to ask for other/more opinions. Is the CPU really my bottleneck? If yes, why is it well below 100% usage?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by ethrbunny, Woot4Moo, ataylor, Mario, 0x499602D2 Jan 7 '13 at 19:40

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
Show us the java code, specifically the way inserts/updates are being performed. –  Woot4Moo Jan 7 '13 at 17:50
    
If there is allot of interaction between Java and the Database this can add significant amounts of overhead. Can you try caching results and backgrounding your changes so you are not waiting on the database all the time? –  Peter Lawrey Jan 7 '13 at 19:12
    
It might be worth investing in a faster CPU but make sure each CPU is faster as you barely use more than one CPU (so quad core or hex core is unlikely to really help) –  Peter Lawrey Jan 7 '13 at 19:16

2 Answers 2

With no knowledge of the Java code (this answer will get updated) I am speculating that your inserts / updates have this syntax:

   openConnection();    
   startTransaction  
   {  
       insertOneRow();  
        commit();  
   }  
   endTransaction();  
   closeConnection();  

Further I also imagine that you are not batching statements together, so that you only call your database X/N times where X is the size of a batch.

I am able to persist over 2 million records into an Oracle (I know yours is MySql) database in sub 3 seconds, so it is not a CPU issue.

share|improve this answer

Maybe you can identify the bottlenecks by using a profiler?

I was using one that is bundled with NetBeans and found them quite helpful.

Here you can find out more: http://netbeans.org/kb/docs/java/profiler-intro.html

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.