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I'm trying to debug an issue involving DecimalFormat#applyPattern(String) in Java 1.6. The default locale is French so the decimal separator by default is ','. However, the pattern specifies applying a '.' to the decimal format instance which it doesn't seem to. I tried to debug into applyPattern() but couldn't see the variable values. I'm not really familiar with patterns and reg-ex's so I'm not sure if the issue is with the pattern or something else. Is it the pattern which is incorrect or there is some other issue with the code?

Here is the code snippet:

public class DecimalFormatTester
{
   static private final DecimalFormat doubleFormat = (DecimalFormat) NumberFormat.getInstance();

     static 
     {
       doubleFormat.applyPattern("############.00");
     }

  public static String toString(double value) 
  {
    synchronized (doubleFormat) 
    {
        return doubleFormat.format(value);
    }
  }
}

Here is a sample line of Junit code which fails:

assertEquals("String values aren't equal", "2179005635.00", DecimalFormatTester.toString(2.179005635E9));
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And question is? –  Roman C Jan 7 '13 at 18:19
    
What is wrong? Is it the pattern due to which it is failing? –  Jake Foster Jan 7 '13 at 18:20
    
Edit a question not a comment to add questions. –  Roman C Jan 7 '13 at 18:21
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The "." in pattern ""############.00" is a placeholder for the (currently set) decimalCharacter.

If you want "." as decimalcharacter then you additionally have to set decimalCharacter, eg. by setting Locale.US

You could save your current locale, then set to Locale.US, then set back your saved Locale, but make sure your app is not multi threaded.

You also could use

DecimalFormatSymbols.getInstance().setDecimalSeparator(".");

share|improve this answer
    
Are you suggesting to simply change the Locale to US before applying the pattern or is there a method on DecimalFormat to specify the decimalCharacter? –  Jake Foster Jan 7 '13 at 18:38
    
There is a method setDecimalSymbols but I have never used that, I would temporarily set the Locale to US, and afterward change it back –  AlexWien Jan 7 '13 at 18:40
    
This worked for me in the static block: final DecimalFormatSymbols dcs = doubleFormat.getDecimalFormatSymbols(); dcs.setDecimalSeparator('.'); doubleFormat.setDecimalFormatSymbols(dcs); –  Jake Foster Jan 7 '13 at 18:53
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In the pattern ############.00, the '.' represents the decimal separator of your locale.

In your case I understand it's the french decimal separator, which is a ','.

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Change the Locale for the apropiate output. In anothe hand, you can use a custom DecimalFormatSymbols.

###,###.###      123,456.789     en_US
###,###.###      123.456,789     de_DE
###,###.###      123 456,789     fr_FR

See more in Locale-Sensitive Formatting

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Thanks for the links, they were helpful. –  Jake Foster Jan 7 '13 at 18:55
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