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I have what I am assuming (based of my relative newness to js) a rather large amount of code within my script tags, I have more than 10 if statements that loop about 6-10 times each, amongst other simple calculations based off drop downs adding to about 150ish lines of code. The calculated variables are then sent to a redirected printable page.

Question is, is there a way to alleviate some of the weight off the page? Apart from deleting from the code, of course.

I fear the large amount of code will jumble up, say, an iPad/iPhone browser and provide wrong answers in the printable page..

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1  
you can paste you code at codereview.stackexchange.com – Roko C. Buljan Jan 7 '13 at 18:31
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Yes, large amounts of javascript affect load times. No, you do not have large amounts of javascript. – Matt Dodge Jan 7 '13 at 18:31
    
It can, yes. Anything you add to a page can affect the loading time of a page. – Kevin B Jan 7 '13 at 18:32
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@roXon there are no classes in javascript. – jbabey Jan 7 '13 at 18:33
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@jbabey really? :D I was not talking about that, but the usual mistake unexperienced programmers do - assigning bunch of over-repeated non-programatic code to elements ID instead of using CLASSES, and I was joking btw. – Roko C. Buljan Jan 7 '13 at 18:35
up vote 2 down vote accepted

You should consider minifying your JavaScript code: http://www.minifyjavascript.com/

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All it did was remove spaces between the lines of code. Does moving the code all into a continuous line actually assist in speed? I have tested that idea in other programming languages with not much success.. – kazahaya Jan 7 '13 at 18:37
    
@kazahaya It can in larger scripts (your script is not large) or scripts that contain lots of comments. Look at jQuery for example. Minified jquery.js is much smaller than non-minified jquery.js. – Kevin B Jan 7 '13 at 18:41
    
@KevinB Fantastic, thank you, I will use that tool then – kazahaya Jan 7 '13 at 18:49

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