Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my object:

public class CMSContentItemFolder
{
    int Id {get; set; }
    public Guid InstanceId { get; set; }
    public List<CMSContentItemFolder> ContentItemFolders { get; set; }
    public List<CMSContentItem> ContentItems { get; set; }
}

So the folder can have infinite levels of subfolders, just like a system folder on your c drive.

In order for me to performs CRUD on a folder and it's children, I have to write recursive methods, which works but is a bit of a pain. I know the Patching API would be better, but I haven't seen examples of it working for recursive objects.

Whats the best way to do this in RavenDb?

Thanks!

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

You should model with encapsulation or referencing, not both. In your object, what is the purpose of an Id on nested CMSContentItemFolder? You should probably reference instead. And the same would apply for content items. They are probably each in their own document.

public List<int> ContentItemFolderIds { get; set; }
public List<int> ContentItemIds { get; set; }

Then you don't have any recursion to contend with when patching.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Matt - you are right about the Id, that should be removed. I am building a CMS and this is for a file repository module. If I did as you suggest wouldn't there be performance concerns if each file and folder where its own raven document? Each instance of the file repository may have hundreds or even thousand of files and folder. With my initial approach, I can retrieve the entire file repository in a single call... –  Eric Douglas Jan 8 '13 at 5:28
    
Like most things, there's a balance to strike between encapsulation and referencing. The main factor is how you load your data. Do you always get all files and folders from the root all the way down to all leaf nodes? If so, encapsulate. If not, reference. Raven can easily handle millions of documents, so that's not a concern. And to get around having to make many separate calls, use Includes –  Matt Johnson Jan 8 '13 at 16:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.