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Consider the following:

>> bin: to-binary {Rebol}
== #{5265626F6C}

>> parse/all bin [s: to end]
== true

I expect s to have captured the head of the binary series, and be of type BINARY!. In Rebol 3 this is the case:

>> type? s
== binary!

>> s == bin
== true

In Rebol 2, it seems that parse must have converted the data to a string (or at least be "imaging" the binary as a string! under the hood, and not comparing equal)

>> type? s
== string!

>> s == bin
== false

Because Rebol 2 is not Unicode, a binary byte string and a character string are basically equivalent. But with Rebol 3's Unicode I surmise you could end up with very different behavior if you wrote:

parse/all to-string bin [s: to end]

Because it would start interpreting multiple byte sequences into the string encoding, which doesn't work if what you really wanted was uninterpreted bytes. :-(

If one wants to write code that works in either Rebol 2 or Rebol 3 equally well in parsing BINARY!, how would you work around this? (Ideally making Rebol 2 act more like 3, of course.)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Indeed, Rebol 2 is actually just "imaging" the data as a STRING! and not copying it, notice the following

>> bin: to-binary {Rebol}
== #{5265626F6C}

>> parse bin [s: (clear s)] 
== true

>> s
== ""

>> bin
== #{}

That's because Rebol 2 had routines available for aliasing string data as binary and vice-versa: AS-BINARY and AS-STRING. Unlike their TO-BINARY and TO-STRING variants, they do not actually make copies of the data.

Here's one idea that you (ummmm, well, I) could try...make a compatibility function (let's call it bin-pos):

bin-pos: func [pos [binary! string!]] [
    return either string? pos [
        ;; we must be using r2, image the parse position back to binary
        as-binary pos
    ] [
        ;; just a no-op in r3, binary parse input yields binary parse positions
        pos
    ]
]

So in the above example, for Rebol 2 the right thing happens, if anywhere you would use s you instead substitute bin-pos s:

>> type? (bin-pos s)
== binary!

>> (bin-pos s) == bin
== true

For cases where you use the COPY dialect word and a new string is made, the same technique will work...but perhaps a different wrapper name should be used. bin-capture?

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You could just add a parse action to your rules that ensures captured data is binary!:

>> bin: to binary! {Rebol}

>> parse/all bin [s: to end (s: to binary! s)]

>> type? s
== binary!

You could wrap this conversion in an ensure-binary helper for documentation purposes.

(Note that if I understand the last paragraph of your answer right, this is basically what you suggest there. However, I think you can just use this approach even for captures made without copy.)

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It does get you a binary, in this simple case. But I'm talking more complex code which needs to do consistent positional comparisons, copy ranges and expect those ranges to be in the same binary series, and also may manipulate the series position in the parse using :s etc. (Due to the last requirement, changing s itself is not an option...you get an error on parse bin [s: to end (s: to binary! s) :s]) Though the types aren't compatible, see my update on modifications to the series indicating it really is the same data under the hood... –  HostileFork Jan 8 '13 at 2:16

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