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Here's the use case:

I have a table with a bunch of unique codes which are either available or not available. As part of a transaction, I want to select a code that is available from the table, then later update that row later in the transaction. Since this can happen concurrently for a lot of sessions at the same time, I want to ideally select a random record and use row-level locking on the table, so that other transactions aren't blocked by the query which is selecting a row from the table.

I am using InnoDB for the storage engine, and my query looks something like this:

select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 order by rand() limit 1 for update

However, rather than locking just one row from the table, it ends up locking the whole table. Can anyone give me some pointers on how to make it so that this query doesn't lock the whole table but just the row?

Update

Addendum: I was able to achieve row-level locking by specifying an explicit key in my select rather than doing the rand(). When my queries look like this:

Query 1:

   select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 and id=5 limit 1 for update

Query 2:

   select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 and id=10 limit 1 for update

However, that doesn't really help solve the problem.

Addendum 2: Final Solution I went with

Given that rand() has some issues in MySQL, the strategy I chose is:

  1. I select 50 code id's where available = 1, then I shuffle the array in the application layer to add a level of randomness to the order.

    select id from tbl_codes where available = 1 limit 50

  2. I start popping codes from my shuffled array in a loop until I am able to select one with a lock

    select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 and id = :id

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure it ends up locking the whole table? How do you detect this? – gd1 Jan 7 '13 at 20:57
    
Simple, I have two client sessions open, I start a transaction in each, run this query in session 1, then run it in session 2, and it locks in session 2 rather than going through. – Eugene Jan 7 '13 at 20:59
    
Addendum: I was able to achieve row-level locking by specifying an explicit key in my select rather than doing the rand(). When my queries look like this: 1. select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 and id=5 limit 1 for update 2. select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 and id=10 limit 1 for update However, that doesn't really help solve the problem. – Eugene Jan 7 '13 at 21:00
    
Another way to get randomness when selecting is to add a random offset to the query, where the random offset is generated in the application layer. Ex: select id from tbl_codes where available = 1 LIMIT :offset, 50 This works well when you have a lot of codes to chose from. – Jay Jul 15 '15 at 23:09
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It may be useful to look at how this query is actually executed by MySQL:

select * from tbl_codes where available = 1 order by rand() limit 1 for update

This will read and sort all rows that match the WHERE condition, generate a random number using rand() into a virtual column for each row, sort all rows (in a temporary table) based on that virtual column, and then return rows to the client from the sorted set until the LIMIT is reached (in this case just one). The FOR UPDATE affects locking done by the entire statement while it is executing, and as such the clause is applied as rows are read within InnoDB, not as they are returned to the client.

Putting aside the obvious performance implications of the above (it's terrible), you're never going to get reasonable locking behavior from it.

Short answer:

  1. Select the row you want, using RAND() or any other strategy you like, in order to find the PRIMARY KEY value of that row. E.g.: SELECT id FROM tbl_codes WHERE available = 1 ORDER BY rand() LIMIT 1
  2. Lock the row you want using its PRIMARY KEY only. E.g.: SELECT * FROM tbl_codes WHERE id = N

Hopefully that helps.

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is that the rows may become unavailable between your points 1 and 2. Maybe he can loop on 1 and 2 until he can lock an available row, and 2 should become "SELECT * FROM tbl_codes WHERE id = N and available = 1", even if it looks unnecessary. – gd1 Jan 7 '13 at 21:30
    
gd1 - that's exactly what I was thinking of doing, thanks jeremycole/gd1. – Eugene Jan 7 '13 at 22:33

Even if not exactly mapping to your question, the problem is somewhat discussed here: http://akinas.com/pages/en/blog/mysql_random_row/

The problem with this method is that it is very slow. The reason for it being so slow is that MySQL creates a temporary table with all the result rows and assigns each one of them a random sorting index. The results are then sorted and returned.

The article does not deal with locks. However, maybe MySQL locks all the rows having available = 1 and does not release them until the end of the transaction!

That article proposes some solution, none of them seems to be good for you, except this one which is, unfortunately, very hacky and I didn't probe its correctness.

SELECT * FROM table WHERE id >= (SELECT FLOOR( MAX(id) * RAND()) FROM table ) ORDER BY id LIMIT 1;

This is the best I can do for you since I don't command MySQL internals. Moreover, the article is pretty old.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm, yea, I suspect it's something with rand() or possibly the "available" range. The problem with the query in your solution is that sometimes it would hit a record that isn't available and not return any row at all. – Eugene Jan 7 '13 at 21:07
    
I see, you are right. The only solution that comes up to my mind (but it is costy!) is to partition the table (e.g. divide availables and not availables) so that the hack would work. But I think this would imply too many changes. – gd1 Jan 7 '13 at 21:09
    
Read jeremycole solution among with my comment – gd1 Jan 7 '13 at 21:31
    
Yea, I was thinking something along those lines... Maybe set up ranges or something, like adding a condition similar to "where id > 100 and < 200" and so forth, then stagger them and keep track of which ranges still have available id's. – Eugene Jan 7 '13 at 22:07

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