Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am using ServiceStack.OrmLite with the SQL Server provider.

Given the code fragment below:

  1. Is there a best practice for retrieving SQL Server exceptions?

  2. What is the best way to know if a record is in the result of the db.Single call ? It seems I get an exception when db.Single is called with an invalid message ID (ie. a message ID that is not in the data set). The call returns without exceptions if messages IDs exist in the database. Is there a way to do this without the try catch block?

Exception if call is made without try/catch block:

ArgumentNullException Value cannot be null.
Parameter name: ENSMessageEntry: 'ID = 25' does not exist

And here is my code:

public ENSStatusResponse GetMessageStatus(int messageID)
{
    var statusResponse = new ENSStatusResponse();

    using (var db = DBConnectionFactory.OpenDbConnection())
    {
        try
        { 
            ENSMessageEntry mes = db.Single<ENSMessageEntry>("ID = " + messageID);
            statusResponse.ENSMessageStatus = mes.Id;
        }
        catch  
        {   
            statusResponse.ENSMessageStatus = 0;
        }
    } 

    return statusResponse;
}
share|improve this question
  1. I don't think this query would generate a SQL Server exception, the exception is coming from .Single which is assuming there will be result and throwing if there is not.

  2. Use Db.GetByIdOrDefault<ENSMessageEntry>(messageID) and check for null

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks very much for your response. I realize your point for number one - just wondering if there is a plan to get SQLExceptions through the ORMlite stack. As for #2... that's what I was looking for, Thanks – overclocker Jan 7 '13 at 22:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.