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I have a class whose constructor might throw an exception.

class A {
    A() { /* throw exception under certain circumstances */ }
};

I would like to catch this exception in the client for a stack-allocated instance. But I find myself forced to extend the try block at least as far as the instance must be alive.

try {
    A a;
    do_something(a);
} catch {
    // ...
}

Now this obviously becomes a problem when the try block is too large to track down the source of the exception:

try {
    A a1;
    A a2;
    do_something(a1, a2);
} catch {
    // Who caused the exception?
}

What would I do to avoid the situation?

UPDATE:

It seems I hadn't explained the problem very well: For obvious reasons, I want to have the try block spanning as little code as necessary (that is, only the construction).

But that creates the problem that I can't use the objects afterwards because they have moved out of scope.

try {
    A a1;
} catch {
    // handle a1 constructor exception
}
try {
    A a2;
} catch {
    // handle a2 constructor exception
}

// not possible
do_something(a1, a2);
share|improve this question
4  
What's your use-case? How are you handling the exception? –  GManNickG Jan 7 '13 at 21:20
1  
Tag the allocated instances, and pass this tag with the exception. –  Rhymoid Jan 7 '13 at 21:21
2  
Nothing really, unless you don't mind resorting to dynamic allocation. I'd ask why it really matters, though... –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '13 at 21:24
1  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Well, I think it does matter how long your try block is. Having a 20-line try block where only 1 line can throw isn't exactly clean coding. –  Jo So Jan 7 '13 at 21:26
2  
@Andy: That code would not pass review in my team. Now every time you use pA you need to check it for validity. Using try/catch properly you already had the ability before to know that the object existed wherever you tried to use it, at compile-time, because it had block scope, but you deliberately eschewed that safety and now must litter if statements about the place. It's a backward step. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '13 at 22:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

A solution that doesn't require changing A is to use nested try/catch blocks:

try {
    A a1;
    try {
        A a2;
        do_something(a1, a2);
    }
    catch {
      // a2 (or do_something) threw
    }
} catch {
    // a1 threw
}

Probably better to avoid doing this if possible though.

share|improve this answer
    
Won't use in practice. Very creative though. –  Jo So Jan 7 '13 at 21:40
1  
@JoSo: This is the only way guaranteed to work for any type. If you use an expected<T> utility, you can make a expected<T> try_construct<T>(Args...) function that catches any exceptions thrown from construction and packs them into the expected<T>. The problem is that this requires your type have non-throwing copy (or ideally/more likely, move) constructors to safely get the expected<T> to the caller without throwing. That's probably your next best thing. –  GManNickG Jan 7 '13 at 22:05
    
@GManNickG or Remy's idea with boost::optional –  Mooing Duck Jan 7 '13 at 22:23
1  
@MooingDuck: Yeah, that's pretty much what expected<T> would be, but without the exception info (or passed back a different way). Note it suffers the same problem: if I do hold an A in the optional, moving it out safely (without dynamic allocation, of course) requires A's can be moved without throwing. –  GManNickG Jan 7 '13 at 22:24

Use heap-constructed objects instead of stack-constructed objects, so that you can test which objects have been constructed successfully, eg:

// or std::unique_ptr in C++11, or boost::unique_ptr ...
std::auto_ptr<A> a1_ptr;
std::auto_ptr<A> a2_ptr;

A *a1 = NULL;
A *a2 = NULL;

try
{
    a1 = new A;
    a1_ptr.reset(a1);
}
catch (...)
{
}

try
{
    a2 = new A;
    a2_ptr.reset(a2);
}
catch (...)
{
}

if( (a1) && (a2) )
    do_something(*a1, *a2);

Alternatively (only if A is copy-constructible):

boost::optional<A> a1;
boost::optional<A> a2;

try
{
    a1 = boost::in_place<A>();
    a2 = boost::in_place<A>();
}
catch (...)
{
    //...
}

if( (a1) && (a2) )
    do_something(*a1, *a2);
share|improve this answer
    
I did mention that in a comment at the top of the code –  Remy Lebeau Jan 7 '13 at 21:33
    
I like the idea of using boost::optional, but I very much dislike this code. –  Mooing Duck Jan 7 '13 at 22:01
1  
@RemyLebeau: Nope, C++ is C++11. If you're not using a C++11 compiler, you're using a legacy C++ language, not the current C++ language. –  GManNickG Jan 7 '13 at 22:18
1  
@RemyLebeau: Check again, with boost::optional, a1 = A(); would be copy constructor. a1 = boost::in_place<A>(); uses the default constructor! –  Mooing Duck Jan 7 '13 at 22:40
1  
Now you need those if statements, creating a new block. You've gained nothing. And should have just used the existing try block in the first place. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 7 '13 at 23:00

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