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I have an if statement that I want to check if it is one of those strings and if its empty but I do not know how to word it correctly. This is basic but, I do not know how to word this on google. Many thanks!

if(condition1 == "string" || condition2 == "string" && is empty){
    do this
}
share|improve this question
1  
you are trying to check if what is empty? – wired_in Jan 7 '13 at 22:15
1  
what is meant with condition1? – bukart Jan 7 '13 at 22:16
    
maybe post a bit of the surrounding code to help clarify what you are trying to achieve? – Stuart Jan 7 '13 at 23:06
    
Here is the jsfiddle: jsfiddle.net/pcproff/3AXN7 – pcproff Jan 8 '13 at 12:38
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Edit: Updated in reference to your jsFiddle

//object drill down
var colField = evt.cell.field; //this gives me the column names of the grid in dojo
var mystring = item[colField] || ""; // gets item based on colField property
var fields = ["Owner", "Home", "Realtor", "Broker"]; // fields to check colField against

//here is the conditional statement. if column Owner, Home, Realtor or Broker property is empty in that object do the following
if(fields.indexOf(colField) !== -1 && mystring === "") {

}

Updated jsFiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/3AXN7/4/

Since you have more than two columns you are checking for, it's much more clear and maintainable to put all of the column names in an array, and then check if colField is in the array, instead of putting all of those conditions in the if statement.

The only problem with this, is that indexOf is not supported in IE6-8. If you want to make sure this works for all browsers, you need to provide a default implementation of indexOf. You can do this with the following code:

if (!Array.prototype.indexOf) {
  Array.prototype.indexOf = function (searchElement /*, fromIndex */) {
    "use strict";

    if (this === void 0 || this === null)
      throw new TypeError();

    var t = Object(this);
    var len = t.length >>> 0;
    if (len === 0)
      return -1;

    var n = 0;
    if (arguments.length > 0) {
      n = Number(arguments[1]);
      if (n !== n)
        n = 0;
      else if (n !== 0 && n !== (1 / 0) && n !== -(1 / 0))
        n = (n > 0 || -1) * Math.floor(Math.abs(n));
    }

    if (n >= len)
      return -1;

    var k = n >= 0
          ? n
          : Math.max(len - Math.abs(n), 0);

    for (; k < len; k++) {
      if (k in t && t[k] === searchElement)
        return k;
    }

    return -1;
  };
}
share|improve this answer
    
This works beautiful and I will mark useful but, I think I did not think it through that multiple "conditions" could have empty "mystrings" so how could I check for all? – pcproff Jan 8 '13 at 13:38
    
Not sure I'm understanding, are you saying mystring does not have to be empty for some conditions, in order for the entire if statement to be true? – wired_in Jan 8 '13 at 15:36
    
Updated original answer to fit your jsFiddle code. – wired_in Jan 8 '13 at 15:57
if((typeof condition1 == 'string' && condition1.length == 0) || (typeof condition2 == 'string' && condition2.length == 0))

Breaking that down, (typeof condition1 == 'string' && condition1.length == 0) simply checks that the variable is a string and has a length of 0. If it evaluates to false, it will check to see if condition2 is a string and has a length of 0. If either statement is true the if statement will return true.

share|improve this answer
    
Why not condition1 === "" ? There's no need for the typeof check. – Alnitak Jan 7 '13 at 22:17
    
@Alnitak Question wasn't entirely clear, doing a typeof and checking the length is an adaptable answer. If OP is explicitly looking for an empty string that is indeed the better solution. :) – Snuffleupagus Jan 7 '13 at 22:22
    
This is what I am checking: if(variable == value1 && mystring.value == "") || (variable2 == value2 && mystring.value == ""){ do this} does not work for me. – pcproff Jan 7 '13 at 22:29
    
@pcproff can you try to be a little more specific in what you're actually trying to accomplish? What is variable/variable2 and what is value1/value2? – Snuffleupagus Jan 7 '13 at 22:31
    
@Snuffleupagus: What's wrong with just condition1 === "" to check for an empty string? – wired_in Jan 7 '13 at 22:45

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