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I have 3 different object (obj1,2,3) as below, and I am trying to form the finalObj which is the union (unique tree list) of the 3 objects..

I am not sure what would be the best way to achieve this..

EDIT: The text is the key here. If a parent node with a same text already exists, we need to just ignore and move to its child node and check if this child node is present else attach this child node to existing parent node and so on...

var obj1 = [{
    text: "TreeRoot",
    items: [
        { text: "Subgroup1"},
        { text: "Subgroup2"}
    ]
}]

var obj2 = [{
    text: "TreeRoot",
    items: [
        { text: "Subgroup3"}
    ]
}]

var obj3 = [{
    text: "Subgroup3",
    items: [{
        text: "subgroup5",
        items: [{
            text: "subgroup6",
            items: [{
                text: "subgroup7",
                items: [{
                    text: "subgroup8"
                }]
            }]
        }]
    }]
}]



var finalObj = [{
    text: "TreeRoot",
    items: [
        { text: "Subgroup1"},
        { text: "Subgroup2"},
        {
            text: "Subgroup3",
            items: [{
                text: "subgroup5",
                items: [{
                    text: "subgroup6",
                    items: [{
                        text: "subgroup7",
                        items: [{
                            text: "subgroup8"
                        }]
                    }]
                }]
            }]
        }
    ]
}]
share|improve this question
    
How is any solution to this problem to know that "Subgroup3" from obj3 goes under TreeRoot? All 'root' items must do a full traversal to see if a name matches any descendant and only if it does not create a new root entry? Note that with the above the order in which you merge these trees would change the result. –  Phrogz Jan 7 '13 at 23:35
    
You'll need custom coding for this. Have you tried anything other than the jQuery merge() function (which is almost completely unrelated to your needs here)? –  Phrogz Jan 7 '13 at 23:40
    
[The][1] solution listed here resolved my issue... [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/14222000/… –  Learner Jan 9 '13 at 0:41

3 Answers 3

var table = {}; // items by id
function recurse(items) {
    for (var i=0; i<items.length; i++) {
        var item = items[i],
            id = item.text;
        if (id in table) 
            table[id].items = (table[id].items && item.items)
              ? table[id].items.concat(item.items) // merge
              : table[id].items || item.items;
        else
            table[id] = item;
        if (item.items)
            recurse(item.items);
    }
}
recurse(obj1), recurse(obj2), recurse(obj3);

// assuming there are no cycles and only one parent per node in the graph
for (var text in table) (function recurse(text) {
    var items = table[text].items;
    if (!items) continue;
    for (var i=0; i<items.length; i++) {
        var id = items[i].text;
        if (id in table) {
            items[i] = table[id];
            recurse(id);
            delete table[id];
        }
    }
})(text);

// now, table consists only of the root keys (should be only one):
for (var id in table)
    var finalObj = table[id];
share|improve this answer

The knack here is to construct the objects in a way that exploits the natural characteristics of javascript objects and facilitates merging.

All arrays in obj1, obj2 and obj3 are redundant as they each contain no more than one item.

Instead of constructing objects with properties text and items, use the text as a key the items as its properties, giving far more compact data structures.

var obj1 = {
    "Subgroup1": null,
    "Subgroup2": null
};
var obj2 = {
    "Subgroup3": null
};
var obj3 = {
    "Subgroup3": {
        "subgroup5": {
            "subgroup6": {
                "subgroup7": {
                    "subgroup8": null
                }
            }
        }
    }
};

Now you have the power of jQuery's $.extend() available to you.

var finalObj = $.extend(true, {}, obj1, obj2, obj3);

which gives :

var finalObj = {
    "Subgroup1": null,
    "Subgroup2": null,
    "Subgroup3": {
        "subgroup5": {
            "subgroup6": {
                "subgroup7": {
                    "subgroup8": null
                }
            }
        }
    }
};

This is achieved with almost no loss of information compared with your original. The loss that occurs is the order of Subgroup1, Subgroup2, Subgroup3, which are now orderless properties of finalObj not ordered elements of an array. Similarly, if there were multiple subgroups at any level, they too would be orderless.

  • If you can live with this constraint, then the above approach will save you a lot of heartache.
  • If you can't live with this constraint, then, with a little thought, the subgroups could still be extracted in the right order.
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice simplification. Though, I think the actual loss is that you cannot use this approach for tree nodes that have more properties than identifier and child nodes. –  Bergi Jan 8 '13 at 1:11
    
Sorry @Bergi, I don't understand your point. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 8 '13 at 1:12
    
In the original data model, the OP can easily add other properties to the node objects such as "color", "position" or whatever next to "text" and "items". This is not possible with the compact structure, and imo that is a greater disadvantage than the loss of the order. –  Bergi Jan 8 '13 at 1:21
    
@Bergi, sorry I disagree. Surely each object, at any level, could contain further properties in addition to subgroup(s)? Though I see what you're driving at. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Jan 8 '13 at 1:26
1  
So you suggest to use a naming convention for the properties, like "everything that starts with subgroup… is considered a child node and other properties are not"? I don't think that is a good idea. While possible in restricted environments, it would at least be a severe constraint. As the OP has a node named "TreeRoot", I don't think it is applicable here. –  Bergi Jan 8 '13 at 1:31

Not sure if this is the right way to merge the tree object, but just thought of getting your feedback / suggestion...

I have a recursive function which returns the node based on id. I check parent id and child id , if parent id exist but couldnt find child id I add the child to parent. If parent id doesnt exist I create a new node, if the child already exits, I just ignore that child...

This way, I am able to union my node (via looping)... Suggestions are welcome!!!!

         var arrayObject=[];

            var ob =    {
                text: "root",
                id: 1,
                items: [
                    {
                        text: "child one",
                        id: 11,
                        items: [
                            {
                                text: "grand child 1",
                                id: 111,
                                items: []},
                            {
                                text: "grand child 2",
                                id: 112,
                                items: []}
                        ]},
                    {
                        text: "child two",
                        id: 12,
                        items: []}
                ]
            };

            function findObjectById(root, id) {
                if (root.items) {
                    for (var k in root.items) {
                        if (root.items[k].id == id) {
                            return root.items[k];
                        }
                        else if (root.items.length) {
                            return findObjectById(root.items[k], id);
                        }
                    }
                }
            };
            var newChild={
                text: "child x",
                id: 115,
                items: []
            };

            for(var i=0;i<2;i++){
                if(i==0){
                    var checkParent = findObjectById(ob, 11);
                    alert(JSON.stringify(checkParent));

                }else{
                    var checkParent = findObjectById(ob, 116);
                }
                if(checkParent) {
                    var checkChild=findObjectById(checkParent, newChild.id);
                    alert(JSON.stringify(checkChild));
                    if(!checkChild){
                        checkParent.items.push(newChild);
                    }
                    arrayObject.push(ob)
                }else{

                    arrayObject.push(newChild);
                }
            }
share|improve this answer

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