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I couldn't find a complete example of how to properly encapsulate a Dictionary. All I needed/wanted to do was 'override' the Add method which I know can't be overridden because it is not virtual. Based on some research I found I needed to encapsulate it using a private Dictionary and implementing the IDictionary Interface.

The most complete example I could find was here, which I mostly copy-pasted and guessed about the things that didn't match (the example implements a read-only dictionary, whereas I want full default functionality with a customized Add() method).

Full Compilable Code below:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Runtime.InteropServices;
using System.Threading;

namespace IDictionary
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Registers<string, dynamic> DynRegistry = new Registers<string, dynamic>();

            DynRegistry.Add("Foo", 100);
            Console.WriteLine("DynRegistry Size: {0}", DynRegistry.Count);
            foreach (var item in DynRegistry)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\tName: {0}, Value: {1}", item.Key, item.Value);
            }
            DynRegistry.Add("Foo2", "Hello World");
            Console.WriteLine("DynRegistry Size: {0}", DynRegistry.Count);
            foreach (var item in DynRegistry)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\tName: {0}, Value: {1}", item.Key, item.Value);
            }
            DynRegistry.Add("Foo", true);
            Console.WriteLine("DynRegistry Size: {0}\r\n", DynRegistry.Count);
            foreach (var item in DynRegistry)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("\tName: {0}, Value: {1}", item.Key, item.Value);
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }

    class Registers<TKey, TValue> : IDictionary<TKey, TValue>,  ICollection
    {
        //Fields
        private Dictionary<TKey, TValue> source;
        private object syncRoot;

        //Constructor
                    public Registers()
    {
        this.source = new Dictionary<TKey, TValue>();
    }

        //Wrapped Methods
                                                public void Add(TKey key, TValue value)
    {
        if (this.source.ContainsKey(key))
        {
            this.source[key] = value;
        }
        else
        {
            this.source.Add(key, value);
        }
    }

        //Implement default Interfaces
                        void ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.CopyTo(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>[] array, int arrayIndex)
    {
        ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> collection = this.source;
        collection.CopyTo(array, arrayIndex);
    }
        public int Count { get { return this.source.Count; } }
        public ICollection<TKey> Keys { get { return this.source.Keys; } }
        public ICollection<TValue> Values { get { return this.source.Values; } }
        bool ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.IsReadOnly { get { return false; } }
        bool ICollection.IsSynchronized { get { return false; } }
        object ICollection.SyncRoot
    {
        get
        {
            if (this.syncRoot == null)
            {
                ICollection collection = this.source as ICollection;

                if (collection != null)
                {
                    this.syncRoot = collection.SyncRoot;
                }
                else
                {
                    Interlocked.CompareExchange(ref this.syncRoot, new object(), null);
                }
            }
            return this.syncRoot;
        }
    }
        public TValue this[TKey key]
    {
        get { return this.source[key]; }
        set { this.source[key] = value; }
    }
        public bool ContainsKey(TKey key) { return this.source.ContainsKey(key); }
        public bool Remove(TKey key) { return this.source.Remove(key); }
        public bool TryGetValue(TKey key, out TValue value) { return this.source.TryGetValue(key, out value); }
        void ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Add(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> collection = this.source;
        collection.Add(item);
    }
        void ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Clear()
    {
        ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> collection = this.source;
        collection.Clear();
    }
        bool ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Contains(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> collection = this.source;
        return collection.Contains(item);
    }
        bool ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.Remove(KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue> item)
    {
        ICollection<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> collection = this.source;
        return collection.Remove(item);
    }
        void ICollection.CopyTo(Array array, int index)
    {
        ICollection collection = new List<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>(this.source);
        collection.CopyTo(array, index);
    }
        IEnumerator<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>.GetEnumerator()
    {
        IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>> enumerator = this.source;
        return enumerator.GetEnumerator();
    }
        IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.source.GetEnumerator();
    }
    }
}

Two reasons I am posting this:

  1. So that anyone else that needs to do this doesn't have to spend 30 minutes re-typing redundant code.
  2. Feedback about whether I did this all correctly. I was confused as to if/why I needed to implement the ICollection interface (ie. Does a normal Dictionary do this or would the IDictionary have the complete complement of Dictionary features without the need for ICollection).

All I really needed was a normal Dictionary with an Add method that does AddOrReplace() instead of Add (or crash because the Key already exists). The work required to achieve this seemed to be a bit of overkill.

share|improve this question
    
Since you aren't inheriting from Dictionary<TKey, TValue> you don't need to implement all the extra interfaces it declares. Just implement IDictionary<TKey, TValue> with methods that wrap your internal Dictionary. EDIT: Just to clarify, 99% of the time, I doubt you (or consumers of your code) will miss specific Dictionary members that don't belong to IDictionary<TKey, TValue>; the IDictionary<TKey, TValue> interface should give you everything you need. –  Chris Sinclair Jan 7 '13 at 23:06
    
However, reviewing the documentation for IDictionary<TKey, TValue> explicitly indicates that intended implementations have Add throw an exception instead of replacing/modifying existing entries. All it seems to intend to allow is having different behaviours for allowing null or not. Considering this, consumers of your code will likely expect the Add to throw an exception if the key exists (and may depend on this!) rather than modify. You should follow the standard if possible as per l4V's answer. See: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Chris Sinclair Jan 7 '13 at 23:11
    
I will be the only consumer of this code, it's a one-off application. But I will indeed use the msdn standard pattern as I4V mentioned. I haven't used dictionaries much so I didn't know it worked like that already :/ –  Josh W Jan 7 '13 at 23:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use

dict[key]=value

for add or replace if that is all you want. So no need to wrap a dictionary.

share|improve this answer
1  
Can't believe I missed that... thanks. –  Josh W Jan 7 '13 at 23:25

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