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I have an app that has thousands of locations and I'd like to know when a user is at one. Because of battery life issues, I was thinking that I could monitor for significant location changes until the user entered a relatively large region (e.g., location+50 meters). At that point I'd switch to higher accuracy. I'd switch back to significant location changes when user leaves the region.

The problem is that it appears that I can only register 20 regions and I really don't want to have to figure out how to pre-process a bunch of locations to cluster them and properly calculate region size... plus this leads to a situation where region size could be so large as to be useless.

Another possibility is to just use the 20 closest regions but there are some cases where this isn't going to work.

Any ideas if there are workarounds to this 20 region limit?

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thanks for pointing that out. I assumed that upvoting was the same as accepting... had no idea that that I had to click on check outline. –  michael Jan 8 '13 at 0:03
    
Yes, there is a practical limit to how many regions you can monitor via startMonitoringForRegion, but if you're just using plain old significant changes, there is absolutely no limit as to how many regions you keep track of yourself. –  Rob Jan 8 '13 at 1:33
    
Nice! It looks like the only advantage of having iOS handle regions is that it will start the app if it's not running at all, but I'm not sure that's a good thing anyway. Easy enough for me to track. Thanks Rob. Not sure how to accept an answer embedded in a comment. –  michael Jan 8 '13 at 4:41
    
@michael I've added an answer so you can accept it and close the question if you're so inclined. As an aside, if you want to use startMonitoringForRegion, I wonder if you could (a) monitor the entering of the 19 nearest regions; and (b) also define a 20th "master" region that covers those other regions and monitor your exiting of that master region, and if so, repeat the process of finding the current 19 closest regions to your current location, define a master region for that and repeat the process. Not very elegant, and probably not worth the effort, but possibly a kludgy workaround. –  Rob Jan 8 '13 at 15:00

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Yes, there is a practical limit to how many regions you can monitor via startMonitoringForRegion, but if you're just using plain old significant changes, there is absolutely no limit as to how many regions you keep track of yourself. Like you said, that's not as elegant as startMonitoringForRegion, which can start your app for you, but it's an alternative.

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Per your comments above, I really think it'll be quite simple to just manage it myself. My goal is to knock it out tonight! –  michael Jan 9 '13 at 3:40

Although I am aware that this is an Android link, the information from Google regarding Android location strategies should be easily applicable to iPhone (and other mobile platforms as well) as the techniques are the same.

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That's a great article, but I'd suggest that if you look at the Apple Location Awareness Programming Guide, you might conclude that the iOS strategies differ because Apple has a variety of services (standard location services, significant change services, region monitoring services) with very iOS-specific battery implications. –  Rob Jan 8 '13 at 2:44
    
What's crazy is that there have to be 10,000 apps that have this issue and other than geoloqi, I don't know of anyone who's attacked it with a standard library. –  michael Jan 8 '13 at 4:43

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