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I have a linked list with this values as examples: 4 5 3 2 7, now I want to swap each node with previous one, like this:

4 5 3 2 7 // this beginning of list
5 4 3 2 7
5 3 4 2 7
5 3 2 4 7
5 3 2 7 4 // the list should now become like this

But unfortunately when I parse for the output I stuck in infinite loop:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct _node {
    int p;
    struct _node *next;
} node;

main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int i, n;
    node *nod = NULL;
    node *nod_tmp = NULL;
    node *nod2 = NULL;
    printf("Enter n: ");
    scanf("%d", &n);
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        nod_tmp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
        scanf("%d", &nod_tmp->p);
        nod_tmp->next = nod;
        nod = nod_tmp;
    }

    i = 0;
    while(i < n)
    {   
        nod_tmp = nod;
        nod = nod->next;
        nod->next = nod_tmp;
        ++i;
    }

    while(nod != NULL)
    {   

        printf("%d\n", nod->p);
        nod = nod->next;
    }
    return 0;
}  
share|improve this question
    
Where is the infinite loop occurring? –  Nashibukasan Jan 8 '13 at 0:14
    
@Nashibukasan When I traverse the list to print values. . while(nod != NULL) { printf("%d\n", nod->p); nod = nod->next; } –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:18
    
possible duplicate of Swapping nodes in a linked list –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 8 '13 at 5:51

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your swap code is wrong. Should be something like this:

i = 1;
nod2 = nod;
while(i < n)
{   
    nod_tmp = nod2->next;
    nod2->next = nod_tmp->next;
    nod_tmp->next = nod2;
    ++i;
}

Or, since swapping every pair basically pushes the first element to the end you can do this:

nod_tmp = nod;
while (nod_tmp->next != NULL)
{
    nod_tmp = nod_tmp->next;
}
// nod_tmp now points to the last element
nod_tmp->next = nod;          // loop from the last element back to the first
nod = nod->next;              // move the list pointer to the second element
nod_tmp->next->next = NULL;   // break the loop at the new last element

Also, you may want to look at your input code. As written it will build the list with the values in reverse order as entered, because it's always adding the next value to the head of the list.

Update

To avoid potential seg_faults the first loop above can be rewritten without the counter like this:

nod2 = nod;
nod_tmp = nod2->next;
while(nod_tmp != NULL)
{   
    nod2->next = nod_tmp->next;
    nod_tmp->next = nod2;
    nod_tmp = nod2->next;
}

Update 2

Here's full code that does what you want. Rather than swap each pair of nodes it just pushes the first node to the end of the list. I've also fixed the input loop so the list gets built in the correct order.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

typedef struct _node {
    int p;
    struct _node *next;
} node;

main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    int i, n;
    node *nod = NULL;
    node *nod_tmp = NULL;
    node *nod2 = NULL;
    printf("Enter n: ");
    scanf("%d", &n);
    for(i = 0; i < n; ++i)
    {
        nod_tmp = (node *)malloc(sizeof(node));
        scanf("%d", &nod_tmp->p);
        if (i == 0)
        {
            nod = nod2 = nod_tmp;
        }
        nod2->next = nod_tmp;
        nod2 = nod_tmp;
    }

    nod_tmp = nod;
    while (nod_tmp->next != NULL)
    {
        nod_tmp = nod_tmp->next;
    }
    // nod_tmp now points to the last element
    nod_tmp->next = nod;          // loop from the last element back to the first
    nod = nod->next;              // move the list pointer to the second element
    nod_tmp->next->next = NULL;   // break the loop at the new last element

    while(nod != NULL)
    {   

        printf("%d\n", nod->p);
        nod = nod->next;
    }
    return 0;
}   
share|improve this answer
    
I get Segmentation fault. –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:28
    
on what line do you get the fault? –  Andrew Cooper Jan 8 '13 at 0:31
    
If you're using the first block of code in my answer then note the n=1 at the beginning. You only want to swap n-1 times, so you you need to start counting from 1, not 0. –  Andrew Cooper Jan 8 '13 at 0:33
    
nod2->next = nod_tmp->next –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:34
    
Also, see updated answer for safer code that terminates at the end of the list, rather than relying on a counter to be correct. –  Andrew Cooper Jan 8 '13 at 0:42

This looks really strange:

while(i < n)
{   
    nod_tmp = nod;
    nod = nod->next;
    nod->next = nod_tmp;
    ++i;
}

Basically, you are looping 2 items assigning them to each other. You need to review this one.

EDIT

OK wrote it for you, seems to be working. (I do this by actual swapping list elements by pairs).

/// reading and stuff...

node *prev = NULL, *start = nod->next;
for(int i = 0; i < n - 1; ++i)
{
    // look at this part, it makes everything obvious
    node *a = nod, *b = nod->next, *c = nod->next->next;

    b->next = a;
    a->next = c;

    nod = a; // changing the current node to next

    if(i == 0)
            {
        start = prev = b; // saving an actual start
            }
    else
    {
        prev->next = b;
        prev = prev->next;
    }

    // printing state to be sure
    for(node *tmp_start = start; tmp_start != NULL; tmp_start = tmp_start->next)
        printf("%d ", tmp_start->p);
    printf("\n");
}

printf("Final answer:\n");
while(start != NULL)
{   
    printf("%d ", start->p);
    start = start->next;
}

You need to input your data in reverse order (or change the reading function a little bit)

Example of using:

Enter n: 5 7 2 3 5 4
5 4 3 2 7
5 3 4 2 7
5 3 2 4 7
5 3 2 7 4
Final answer:
5 3 2 7 4 
share|improve this answer
    
I stuck there, and I don't know what to do. –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:20
    
You list is, basically, read from the end to start, not as 5 lines you wrote. Just carefully watch this place and you'll see what to do. –  dreamzor Jan 8 '13 at 0:21

Let's follow this loop:

while(i < n)
{   
    nod_tmp = nod;         // 1
    nod = nod->next;       // 2
    nod->next = nod_tmp;   // 3
    ++i;
}
  1. nod_tmp and nod now point to the same node.
  2. nod is now pointing to nod->next (so nod == nod_temp->next)
  3. nod->next is now pointing at not_temp which is the old address of nod.

Now that nod->next is pointing at the old address of nod (which nod_temp is also pointing to) you have a linked list whose tail points to its head.

This while loop might work better for you:

nod2 = nod;
nod_tmp = nod->next;
while(nod_tmp != NULL)
{   
    nod2->next = nod_tmp->next;
    nod_tmp->next = nod2;
    nod_tmp = nod2->next;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I get Segmentation fault. –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:28
    
Ah, Fixed it but others have more complete answers than I do. –  Gunther Fox Jan 8 '13 at 5:49

You need to clear nod->next of the last entry in the list after you have finished swapping and before you print the results.

share|improve this answer

c++11 way ..

Compile with: g++ --std=c++11 -Wall -Wextra mylist.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <list>

template <class List>
void print(const List& list) {
    for (auto i : list)
        std::cout << i << ' ';
    std::cout << std::endl;
}

template <class List>
void swap(List& list) {
    auto i(list.begin());
    auto next(i);
    auto end(list.end());
    while (++next != end) {
        auto tmp = *i;
        *i++ = *next;
        *i = tmp;
        print(list);
    }
}

int main(int, char**) {
    std::list<int> list {4, 5, 3, 2, 7};
    print(list);
    swap(list);
}
share|improve this answer
    
I have old compiler that doesn't support C++11, I need it in C language. –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:56
    
ah sorry, it's these darned stackoverflow tags; when I search for c++ it turns the '+'s into ' 's and gives me all the C stuff - I was actually wondering why the code looked all C like :) - I hope it helps evangelize a C user or two though still ;) –  matiu Jan 8 '13 at 0:59
    i = 0;
    while(i < n)
    {
        printf("%d\n", nod->p);
        nod = nod->next;
        i++;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
output: 2 7 2 7 2 –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:17
    
It's the swap code that's wrong, not the output code. –  Andrew Cooper Jan 8 '13 at 0:27
    
when you do nod->next = nod_tmp it loads entire nod_tmp into nod_next, not only a value, so your nod keeps getting bigger and bigger, should you do it with 2 nodes? it is a requirement? –  Vahid Farahmand Jan 8 '13 at 0:28
    
@VahidFarahmand 2 nodes is not requirement. –  SIFE Jan 8 '13 at 0:35

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