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I am trying to implement the fibonacci function in haskell just to try the language out, but I am already stuck at just compiling my program. I have the following code:

main = do
    fib :: (Num a) => a -> a
    fib 0 = 0
    fib 1 = 1
    fib x = fib (x - 1) + fib (x - 3)
    fib 348

I don't know what I am doing wrong. This is the output of ghc while compiling it with ghc --make fib.hs

[1 of 1] Compiling Main           ( fib.hs, fib.o )
fib.hs:3:15: parse error on input `=´

In case this is relevant, I am using windows.

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Also, keep in mind that it's telling you in the error message where the error is - knowing the '=' at 3:15 (line 3 character 15) is the offending one is often highly useful. –  Andrew Jan 8 '13 at 15:00

1 Answer 1

fib 0 = 0 etc are not "actions" that can be sequenced in do. Define fib outside main (or in where, or in let ... in), then decide what you want to do with it. fib 348 just calculates a number; but you need an IO result for main.

I don't have an interpreter nearby, but something like this:

main = do
  putStrLn $ show $ fib 348
  where
    fib 0 = 0
    fib 1 = 1
    fib x = fib (x - 1) + fib (x - 3)

or this:

fib :: (Num a) => a -> a
fib 0 = 0
fib 1 = 1
fib x = fib (x - 1) + fib (x - 3)

main = do
  putStrLn (show (fib 348))

EDIT: Regarding the comment below and "stack size too small": There is a typo in your code, which I blindly copied. Fibonacci is fib x = fib (x - 1) + fib (x - 2); you have fib (x - 3) in your code. This means that when fib 2 is reached, it will be evaluated as fib 1 + fib (-1). Now, when you evaluate fib (-1), that's an infinite loop, since you "dropped off the bottom" and will just continue to go deeper and deeper. And stacks are typically not infinite.

Also be aware that calculating a big Fibonacci number in this way (without memoisation) is very, very, very slow.

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thank you! that at least executes. however, it is saying that the stack size is too small. I guess this has to do something with this being a recursive function? I don't understand why this would occur though –  nils8950 Jan 8 '13 at 0:39
1  
@nils8950 It should be noted that even with the correct fib definition, computing fib 348 would take an awful lot of time using that algorithm. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 8 '13 at 0:47
    
putStrLn . show is equivalent to just print, no? –  Louis Wasserman Jan 8 '13 at 18:51

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