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I have a Java library that needs to call some fortran subroutines (that are pretty complicated, and should not be re-implemented in java). The fortran compiler will generate some platform-specific .so files. I then want to hook these up to JNA to be able to call them from Java.

I found this resource on calling fortran from JNA here, which doesn't seem to be too bad: http://www.javaforge.com/wiki/66061

However, my question is whether I can get Maven to compile the subroutines and place the generated library files in target/ or something like that, and be able to pick them up automatically from JNA. I feel like I could do this without too much trouble if I was using a Makefile, but have no idea how I'd get Maven to do it.

Moreover, I'm using m2e, the maven plugin for eclipse, so it seems that the compatibility of any maven plugins that might work by themselves is even less likely with m2e.

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I'm going to focus on the maven-specific approach. I don't really know m2e, but if you get the basic maven working, then any ide should just defer to it. Hopefully this is helpful.

There is the exec plugin which allows you to execute external programs. So, if you think you can knock it up quickly with a makefile, this might be the easiest way of doing so. You end up relying more on the environment than the plugins, which is not the maven way. But it will probably get the job done.

Professor Google replied with this article, which looks a little like what you want to do. A lot of the topics are around compiling C libraries for use in Java. So it should be somewhat close (even though you're calling out to different compilers, etc). There's been enough people building native libraries that there's a plugin for that, although again it focuses on libraries written in C and not Fortran.

Good luck!

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Fortran (77?) and C should not be very different. You can even use the same GCC for both. Just be avare of the name mangling. –  Vladimir F Jan 8 '13 at 8:35

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