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I've got a bunch of types that implement IComparable<T>. Because these types implement that interface, it makes sense to provide the following overloads:

/// <summary>Equality comparison operator.</summary>
/// <param name="lhs">The left hand side.</param>
/// <param name="rhs">The right hand side.</param>
/// <returns>True if <paramref name="lhs"/> is equal to <paramref name="rhs"/>; otherwise, false.</returns>
public static bool operator==(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    if (object.ReferenceEquals(lhs, null))
    {
        return object.ReferenceEquals(rhs, null);
    }

    return lhs.CompareTo(rhs) == 0;
}

/// <summary>Inequality comparison operator.</summary>
/// <param name="lhs">The left hand side.</param>
/// <param name="rhs">The right hand side.</param>
/// <returns>True if <paramref name="lhs"/> is not equal to <paramref name="rhs"/>; otherwise, false.</returns>
public static bool operator !=(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    return !(lhs == rhs);
}

/// <summary>Less than comparison operator.</summary>
/// <param name="lhs">The left hand side.</param>
/// <param name="rhs">The right hand side.</param>
/// <returns>True if <paramref name="lhs"/> is less than <paramref name="rhs"/>; otherwise, false.</returns>
public static bool operator <(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    if (lhs == null)
    {
        if (rhs == null)
        {
            return false;
        }
        else
        {
            return true;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        return lhs.CompareTo(rhs) < 0;
    }
}

/// <summary>Greater than comparison operator.</summary>
/// <param name="lhs">The left hand side.</param>
/// <param name="rhs">The right hand side.</param>
/// <returns>True if <paramref name="lhs"/> is greater than <paramref name="rhs"/>; otherwise, false.</returns>
public static bool operator >(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    return rhs < lhs;
}

/// <summary>Less than or equal comparison operator.</summary>
/// <param name="lhs">The left hand side.</param>
/// <param name="rhs">The right hand side.</param>
/// <returns>True if <paramref name="lhs"/> is less` than or equal to <paramref name="rhs"/>; otherwise, false.</returns>
public static bool operator <=(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    return !(rhs < lhs);
}

/// <summary>Greater than or equal comparison operator.</summary>
/// <param name="lhs">The left hand side.</param>
/// <param name="rhs">The right hand side.</param>
/// <returns>True if <paramref name="lhs"/> is greater than or equal to <paramref name="rhs"/>; otherwise, false.</returns>
public static bool operator >=(T lhs, T rhs)
{
    return !(lhs < rhs);
}

This is a lot of code to repeat over and over. Is there some means of creating an abstract class or something (e.g. C++'s std::rel_ops) which would make it easier to implement these?

share|improve this question
1  
I can't see how it makes any sense to implement all those operators. IComparable<> requires only a single method to be implemented. If you have to break it down (why?) then you only need the == and < operators to implement CompareTo(). Thinking about this in C++ may well be getting in the way. –  Hans Passant Jan 8 '13 at 1:49
    
@Hans: In C#, if you implement ==, you must implement !=, or a compile error results. Same for < and >. If you implement IComparable and don't implement all these operators, FxCop yells. –  Billy ONeal Jan 8 '13 at 1:53
    
Why are you talking about implementing operators? IComparable doesn't require an operator at all. –  Hans Passant Jan 8 '13 at 1:55
    
@Hans: Yes, but FxCop does: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182163.aspx –  Billy ONeal Jan 8 '13 at 2:00
1  
Sigh. A robot will beat the stuffing out of common sense every time. Just implementing IComparable to get an ordered collection isn't good enough I guess. –  Hans Passant Jan 8 '13 at 2:10
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1 Answer

There's a way, but I am not sure I would suggest it. In the example I only define two operators for brevity. In one of them, I cast the instance of TemplateComparable<T> to T because in the class constraints, T must indeed inherit from TemplateComparable<T> and the cast will be valid.

abstract class TemplateComparable<T> where T : TemplateComparable<T>, IComparable<T>
{
    public static bool operator ==(TemplateComparable<T> lhs, T rhs)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(lhs, null))
        {
            return ReferenceEquals(rhs, null);
        }
        return rhs.CompareTo(lhs as T) == 0;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(TemplateComparable<T> lhs, T rhs)
    {
        return !(lhs == rhs);
    }
}

class Foo : TemplateComparable<Foo>, IComparable<Foo>
{
    public int CompareTo(Foo other)
    {
        //Write your comparison code
        return 0;
    }
}

Sample usage:

var v1 = new Foo();
var v2 = new Foo();
var equals = v1 == v2; //equals will be true

An alternative where TemplateComparable<T> implements IComparable<T> and Foo overrides its members:

abstract class TemplateComparable<T> : IComparable<T> where T : TemplateComparable<T>
{
    public abstract int CompareTo(T other);

    public static bool operator ==(TemplateComparable<T> lhs, T rhs)
    {
        if (ReferenceEquals(lhs, null))
        {
            return ReferenceEquals(rhs, null);
        }
        return rhs.CompareTo(lhs as T) == 0;
    }

    public static bool operator !=(TemplateComparable<T> lhs, T rhs)
    {
        return !(lhs == rhs);
    }
}

class Foo : TemplateComparable<Foo>
{
    public override int CompareTo(Foo other)
    {
        //Write your comparation code
        return 0;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Why would you not suggest it? Seems like it'll work fine. –  Billy ONeal Jan 8 '13 at 1:10
    
@BillyONeal It would work, but for me it seems a bit like a hack. It is not very readable and without proper documentation it could become unmaintainable. I'd use it with caution. –  Eve Jan 8 '13 at 1:14
    
Why is the rhs param a T instead of a TemplateComparable<T>? –  juharr Jan 8 '13 at 1:44
    
@juharr For simplicity. If you used TemplateComparable<T> you would have to cast it to T because TemplateComparable<T> doesn't implement IComparable<T>. You could make it implement that interface and implement the abstract members, then override them in your derived class, but I thought that it'd make the example too complicated. –  Eve Jan 8 '13 at 1:47
    
@Eve: More unmaintainable than having the same 50 lines of code duplicated everywhere? –  Billy ONeal Jan 8 '13 at 1:49
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