Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Given a large log file, what is the best way to grep a block of text?

text to be ignored
more text to be ignored
---                                 <---- start capture here
lots of 
text with separators like "---"
---
spanning 
multiple lines
---                                 <---- end capture here
text to be ignored
more text to be ignored

What is known?

  • Max number of characters in line (55 but may be less)
  • Number of lines in a block
  • Separator (which may repeat itself)

What regular expression would match this block? Desired output: list of blocks of text.

Please assume Linux command line environment

share|improve this question
    
Using what toolchain? Unix command line? (grep,sed,awk) –  Michael Berkowski Jan 8 '13 at 0:50
    
Yes please. Unix command line –  Jam Jan 8 '13 at 0:51
    
so for the example text you list below, you need 1 or 2 or ?? blocks of output? What do you want to do with the ----s? (Consider editing your question with this info). Good luck. –  shellter Jan 8 '13 at 1:16
    
Updated question. I ultimately need to grab all the blocks ignoring all content outside of it. –  Jam Jan 8 '13 at 1:19
    
Check out csplit(1) command. Splits one file into multiple files based on a pattern match. –  brian beuning Jan 8 '13 at 1:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Several years ago I used this to split patches into hunks:

sed -e '$ {x;q}' -e '/@@/ !{H;d}' -e '/@@/ x' # note - i know sed better now

Replace /@@/ with /---/.

To remove everything before first '---' and after last '---' add -e '1,/---/d' and remove the whole -e '$ {x;q}'.

Result would be like this:

sed -e '1,/---/d' -e '/---/ !{H;d}' -e x

Just tested it and it works with the given example.

share|improve this answer
    
Getting sed: 1: "$ {d;q} ": extra characters at the end of q command –  Jam Jan 8 '13 at 1:31
    
I just copied the command and executed it. Different version of sed? I have 4.2.1 here. –  aragaer Jan 8 '13 at 1:32
    
How do you find out sed version please? –  Jam Jan 8 '13 at 1:34
    
sed --version –  aragaer Jan 8 '13 at 1:36
    
Yes, tried that, getting an Illegal Version. I am running on MAC –  Jam Jan 8 '13 at 1:39

Keep it simple:

$ awk 'NR==FNR {if (/^---/) { if (!start) start=NR; end=NR } next} FNR>=start && FNR<=end' file file
---                                 <---- start capture here
lots of
text with separators like "---"
---
spanning
multiple lines
---                                 <---- end capture here

$ awk 'NR==FNR {if (/^---/) { if (!start) start=NR; end=NR } next} FNR>start && FNR<end' file file
lots of
text with separators like "---"
---
spanning
multiple lines
share|improve this answer

If you have enough memory, you can use the following line. Note, however, that it will read the whole logfile into memory!

perl -0777 -lnE 'm{ ^--- .+ ^--- }xms and say $&' logfile
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.