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The man page for newlocale(3) says in part:

The mask is the logical OR of the following:

LC_COLLATE_MASK   Collation  
LC_CTYPE_MASK     Character type  
LC_MESSAGES_MASK  Messages
LC_MONETARY_MASK  Monetary
LC_NUMERIC_MASK   Numeric
LC_TIME_MASK      Time
LC_ALL_MASK       The logical OR of all of the above

but it doesn't say what each of the mask bits actually means specifically. In my case, I need the localized strings for AM_STR, PM_STR, month abbreviations (ABMON_1, ...), full month names (MON_1, ...), weekday abbreviations (ABDAY_1, ...), and full weekday names (DAY_1, ...).

As an educated guess, I think I need LC_MESSAGES_MASK -- but do I also need LC_TIME_MASK?

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Did you try it? –  Carl Norum Jan 8 '13 at 0:50
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@CarlNorum: yes and I apparently do need LC_TIME_MASK. But I want to ensure that this is indeed the correct answer (or should be) across all platforms as opposed to a particular quirk that may exist on my platform (which happens to me Mac OS X). –  Paul J. Lucas Jan 8 '13 at 0:55
    
What other platforms do you care about? Linux doesn't have newlocale(3) as far as I can tell. –  Carl Norum Jan 8 '13 at 1:02
1  
You need LC_TIME_MASK; you don't need LC_MESSAGES_MASK for your stated requirements. LC_MESSAGES controls error messages, not time formatting. To see what the 'unmasked' names such as LC_TIME mean, consult the man page for setlocale(3). They are standard C. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 8 '13 at 1:02
    
@CarlNorum: newlocale(3) exists on two different Linux systems I have access to. –  Paul J. Lucas Jan 8 '13 at 1:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You need LC_TIME_MASK; you don't need LC_MESSAGES_MASK for your stated requirements.

LC_MESSAGES controls error messages, not time formatting. To see what the 'unmasked' names such as LC_TIME mean, consult the man page for setlocale(3). They are standard C (though the POSIX page linked to includes some extensions — notably the "POSIX" locale).

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You can find a detailed description of locales in POSIX, here

The different types are defined

  1. LC_CTYPE Character classification and case conversion.
  2. LC_COLLATE Collation order.
  3. LC_MONETARY Monetary formatting.
  4. LC_NUMERIC Numeric, non-monetary formatting.
  5. LC_TIME Date and time formats.
  6. LC_MESSAGES Formats of informative and diagnostic messages and interactive responses.
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