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I found a code in this site on how to check if the file exists or not, and then added some code to match my idea. Am I doing this correct?

declare file="file.txt"
declare regex=$skedtemp
declare file_content=$( cat "${file}" )
if [[ " $file_content " =~ $regex ]] 
then
    skedran=$((RANDOM%200+600))
    skedtemp="SN$skedran"
    sked=$skedtemp
else
    sked=$skedtemp
fi

if it already exist then it will generate another random number and if it does not exist, the generated number will then be used.

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2 Answers 2

To test if files exists you can do this

[ -a file.txt ]

or

[ -e file.txt ]

or

[ -f file.txt ]

In response to Jonathan Leffler’s comment

File operators:

  -a FILE        True if file exists.

ref

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Hmmm...OK, some different version of ... something. man test sayeth 'EXPRESSION1 -a EXPRESSION2 both EXPRESSION1 and EXPRESSION2 are true'. This was on RHEL5. man bash does show the text you show. However, it does not tell the whole story: bash -c '[ -f file.txt -a ! -L file.txt ] && echo Yes || echo No' has -a acting as an 'and' operator. So, the -a operator appears to be ... err, polymorphic? It seems odd to add yet another 'file exists' operator when there were already sufficient and the -a already had a meaning. Weird! But lots of stuff in bash seems odd to me. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 8 '13 at 6:26
    
@JonathanLeffler its akin to [ $foo ] and [ -n $foo ] –  Steven Penny Jan 8 '13 at 6:38

You're probably looking for grep

file="file.txt"
if grep "$skedtemp" $file
then
    skedran=$((RANDOM%200+600))
    skedtemp="SN$skedran"
fi
sked=$skedtemp
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