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I am sorry to keep asking versions of the same question but this seems difficult to achieve. Here's the code I have so far:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>

   <style type="text/css">

       body, html{
    height: 100%;
}
        #outer {
            width: 90%;
            height: 90%;
            margin: 5% 5% 5% 5%;
            background-color: #333;
        }
        #left-content {
            height: 100%;
            width: 50%;
            float:left;
        }
        #right-content {
            height: 100%;
            width: 50%;
            float:left;
        }
    </style>

    <div id="outer">
      <div id="left-content" style="background-color: red;">xx</div>
      <div id="right-content" style="background-color: yellow;">xx</div> 

<!-- we need to clear -->
<br style="clear:both" />

    </div>

</body>
</html>

Now it seems I see scroll bars but I just want the outer DIV to occupy 90% of the screen and there not to be scrollbars.

Find the fiddle here.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Here is how I would do it: http://jsfiddle.net/remibreton/8hfwp/1/

The trick here is to leave the browser figure out the width and height of the outer element. To do so you specify top:0; bottom:0; left:0; right:0; to make sure it fills up the entire available space. Then you add margin:5%; to reduce the height and width to 90%. The outer element should be position:relative; to allow absolute positioning inside it.

For the content elements, they can both be width:50%; height:100%. What you need to do is to make sure that the right one get a special left:50% treatment.

HTML

<div id="outer">
    <div class="content left">xx</div>
    <div class="content right">xx</div> 
</div>

CSS

body, html { height: 100%; }
#outer { position:absolute; margin:5%; bottom:0; top:0; left:0; right:0; overflow:hidden; } /* margin:5% to make sure the width and height are actually 90%. Overflow is optional */
.content { position:absolute; width:50%; height:100%; } /* Applies to both content element */
.content.left { background-color:yellow; }
.content.right { background-color:red; left:50%; } /* Left position is equal to the right content element */

This method allows cleaner and more flexible CSS than what you previously had. Bonus internet points!

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This is a pretty interesting bug I've never seen. Without going with the nasty body { overflow:hidden; } approach, I've found some fixes:

1 - Using display:inline-block (not the actually wanted)

    #outer {
      display:inline-block;
        width: 90%;
        height: 90%;
        margin: 5% 5% 5% 5%;
        background-color: #333;
    }

2 - Using padding instead of margin (not the actually wanted)

    #outer {
        width: 90%;
        height: 90%;
        padding: 5% 5% 5% 5%;
        background-color: #333;
    }

3 - Using position absolute (recommended)

    #outer {
        position:absolute;top: 5%;bottom: 5%;right: 5%;left: 5%;
        background-color: #333;
    }

I will edit this answer on further investigation of this issue.

As per http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/box.html#box-dimensions

The percentage is calculated with respect to the width of the generated box's containing block. Note that this is true for 'margin-top' and 'margin-bottom' as well.

Which means that by putting 90% width on the body, will cause the 5% of the margin to be 5% out of 90%, instead of the expected 100%, which causes the "bug." - Same applies to padding.

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change overflow property to hidden(overflow:hidden;) then change the margin of #outer to margin:2.5% 5%;. Here is the full code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <title></title>
</head>
<body>

   <style type="text/css">

       body, html{
    height: 100%;
    overflow:hidden;
}
        #outer {
            width: 90%;
            height: 90%;
            background-color: #333;
            margin: 2.5% 5%;
        }
        #left-content {
            height: 100%;
            width: 50%;
            float:left;
        }
        #right-content {
            height: 100%;
            width: 50%;
            float:left;
        }
    </style>

    <div id="outer">
      <div id="left-content" style="background-color: red;">xx</div>
      <div id="right-content" style="background-color: yellow;">xx</div> 

<!-- we need to clear -->
<br style="clear:both" />

    </div>

</body>
</html>

Hope it'll work!

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Try this:

body, html{
        height: 100%;
        margin: 0;
    }
    #outer {
        width: 90%;
        height: 90%;
        position: absolute;
        margin: 5%;
        background-color: #333;
    }
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It seems to be being caused by margin collapsing going wrong. Add padding:0.01px to the <body> and it works like it should.

If you want something fixed-size on the screen, you should probably just use position:fixed like so:

#outer {
    position:fixed;
    left: 5%; right: 5%; top: 5%; bottom: 5%;
    background:#333;
}
#left-content {
    position:absolute;
    left:0; top: 0; width:50%; bottom: 0;
}
#left-content {
    position:absolute;
    left:50%; top: 0; width:50%; bottom: 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
it doesn't work with padding:1px nor 0.01px (which btw is a wrong pixel quantity) –  Tom Roggero Jan 8 '13 at 3:19
    
Worked just fine when I tried it, and 0.01px is perfectly valid. If values like 13.33px are invalid, then so is 10pt. –  Niet the Dark Absol Jan 8 '13 at 3:21
    
Please refer to w3.org/TR/css3-values/#absolute-lengths By considering pixel as the lowest unit, we cannot split pixels. –  Tom Roggero Jan 8 '13 at 3:25
    
Please refer to ejohn.org/blog/sub-pixel-problems-in-css as each browser implements a different rounding algorythm, ergo no guarantee on the result as you might expect. –  Tom Roggero Jan 8 '13 at 3:27

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