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I'm assigning a function to a variable like so:

def hello(name):
    print "Hello %r \n" % name

king = hello
print "%r, King of Geeks" % king("Arthur")

In the terminal it is returning:

Hello 'Arthur'
None, King of Geeks

What gives?

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1  
Since you do not have a return statement, the method returns None, which is what you see printed. –  Burhan Khalid Jan 8 '13 at 5:21
    
You may not want to be using %r as that returns the repr of the object, and likely not the string you're expecting. Try replacing that with %s (after implementing the suggestions below). –  RocketDonkey Jan 8 '13 at 5:25
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

hello() is printing something, but returns None. (all functions return None by default unless you explicitly return something)

>>> result = hello('test')
Hello 'test' 

>>> print result
None

If you make hello() return the text, rather than print it, you'll get the expected result:

def hello(name):
    return "Hello %r \n" % name

king = hello
print "%r, King of Geeks" % king("Arthur")

"Hello 'Arthur' \n", King of Geeks

I suggest using New String Formatting instead of % as well:

print "{}, King of Geeks".format(king("Arthur"))
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Thanks, this made it all clear to me! –  Chiko Jan 8 '13 at 5:27
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Your hello function is printing the string it creates, rather than returning it.

Then you try to substitute the return value from calling the function into another string.

Because your hello function doesn't return anything, it effectively returns None instead, hence why that gets substituted in. Just change the print into a return inside your hello function and things will work as expected.

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You're printing the result of the call to king("Arthur"), which is None as it does not return a value.

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This also works

def hello(name):
  print("hello, %s" % name)

king = hello
king("arthur")

Output

hello, arthur
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