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Suppose i read the csv file into a data frame called "d". I wish to print the last 2 rows of this data frame. I tried the below but it is printing all the content starting from n-1. Can someone help me understand this behavior please.

> n<-nrow(d)
> n
[1] 153
> subset(d[n:n-1,])
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5:5-1 [1] 4 ... –  BondedDust Jan 9 '13 at 8:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can just use tail

  tail(d, 2)

Will give the last two rows.

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This is working for me ...

d <- matrix(1:10,nrow=5)
d
     [,1] [,2]
[1,]    1    6
[2,]    2    7
[3,]    3    8
[4,]    4    9
[5,]    5   10

d <- as.data.frame(d)
d
  V1 V2
1  1  6
2  2  7
3  3  8
4  4  9
5  5 10

n <- nrow(d)
> n
[1] 5
d[n:(n-1),] ## Specifying the number of the row inside the brackets.
 V1 V2
5  5 10
4  4  9

d[n:n-1,] ## without brackets it will do 5:5 -1 = 4, so printing only the fourth row
  V1 V2
4  4  9
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No need for subset here. You are using [. –  mnel Jan 8 '13 at 6:40
    
@mnel yeah rite.. :) edited the answer. –  user1021713 Jan 8 '13 at 6:42

@mnel is correct that using tail() would probably be the easiest, however I think that your confusion has to do with how subset() and indexing work in general. In your example be mindful of how you index matrices and data.frames since

d[(n:n - 1), ]

is not the same as

d[n:(n-1), ]

so check the difference carefully since the order of operations are important to understand. The subset() function also indexes based on a logical indicator and has the form

 subset(object, subset = logicalvector)

where the logical vector gives the rows that you want to extract. See ?subset for more detail.

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I would use: tail(d, 2) or d[(n-1):n, ] Hope it helps

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