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On a webpage, I am displaying a number of picture collections (I show the thumbnails for each collection). Each picture has five relevant tables:

likes (id, user_id, picture_id),
views (id, user_id, picture_id),
comments (id, user_id, picture_id, comment),

pictures (id (which equals the "picture_id" in the previous tables), collection_id, picture_url and several other columns),
collections (id (equal to collection_id in previous table), and several other columns.

When loading my page, I need to aggregate the number of likes, views and comments for all pictures in each collection, so as to show those numbers under each collection.

So basically: count the likes for each picture, count them all up, display number. Count the views for each picture, count them all up, display number. Count the comments for each picture, count them all up, display number. And then rinse and repeat for all collections.

I'm pretty new at mysql, and I'm struggling between selects, multiple joins, counts, php vs mysql, etc etc. I'm sure there's many ways I can do this that would be very inefficient, so I'm hoping you can tell me the best/fastest/most efficient way to do this.

Thanks in advance!

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3  
before you start. If you plan showing quite some pictures/collections and the aggregated sums... rather save them per image as a int column. When a User likes an image, update the like-count on that image and also store the like in the "likes" table as well for further data analysis. But SUMING over thousands of datasets just requires way to much power for large sets of data. (my humble opinion) –  Najzero Jan 8 '13 at 7:42
    
Btw, I just assume that you have a comment field as well in the comments table :) –  SWeko Jan 8 '13 at 7:46
    
@Najzero, I'm only showing 20 collections at a time, each of which will have on average five pictures. Do you think that's too much? –  Phil Jan 8 '13 at 7:47
    
@SWeko Oops, quite right! Fixed. –  Phil Jan 8 '13 at 7:48
1  
@Phil, yeah, that would be nothing to be worrying about too much, BUT then you are cement fixed into that scenario (bad scalable). If your website gets super famous and your images get thousands of likes/comments, this will even hurt when only 20 images are displayed per page. There are some approaches like the "thing" and "data" (yep, only 2 tables for your complete database) that are awesomely fast when the application around is well designed... but for your issue. It still would not hurt saving some counts in int columns an update them upon action –  Najzero Jan 8 '13 at 7:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can solve this with selects and left joins.

Since you'll count entries on each table for every pictureId, your pictures table will be the left side of each relation. So:

select 
    p.id as pictureId,
    count(distinct l.id) as count_likes,
    count(distinct v.id) as count_views,
    count(distinct c.id) as count_comments
from
    pictures as p
    left join likes as l on p.id = l.pictureId
    left join views as v on p.id = v.pictureId
    left join comments as c on p.id = c.pictureId
group by
    p.id

Basically, you are counting every record in each table for each record in the pictures table; if there are no records in likes, views or comments, the count will be zero, respectively.

Of course, you can expand this idea for collections:

select
    c.id as collection_id,
    p.id as picture_id,
    count(distinct l.id) as count_likes,
    count(distinct v.id) as count_views,
    count(distinct c.id) as count_comments
from
    collections as c
    left join pictures as p on c.id = p.collection_id
    left join likes as l on p.id = l.picture_Id
    left join views as v on p.id = v.picture_Id
    left join comments as c on p.id = c.picture_Id
group by
    c.id,
    p.id

If you want to filter your results for each collection, you only need to add where c.id = aValue before the group by (where aValue is the collection Id you want to retrieve)

Hope this helps you.


If you only need the aggregate data for each collection:

select
    c.id as collection_id,
    count(distinct l.id) as count_likes,
    count(distinct v.id) as count_views,
    count(distinct c.id) as count_comments
from
    collections as c
    left join pictures as p on c.id = p.collection_id
    left join likes as l on p.id = l.picture_Id
    left join views as v on p.id = v.picture_Id
    left join comments as c on p.id = c.picture_Id
group by
    c.id

This should do the trick ;-)

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1  
I think you'll need to use count(distinct ...) there, otherwise all the non-zero counts will come out equal to the product of the actual values (since you're basically doing an unrestricted cross join on the matching rows of the likes, views and comments tables). –  Ilmari Karonen Jan 8 '13 at 8:13
    
@IlmariKaronen: there is no cross join involved. The outer join will return NULL for those where no likes or views exists, and null will be ignored by count() –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 8 '13 at 8:17
2  
@a_horse_with_no_name: Yes, but consider the case where there are, for a given picture, e.g. 2 likes, 4 views and 3 comments. Then the group for that picture will consist of 2*4*3 = 24 rows, with no nulls, and all the counts will return 24 unless you use the distinct keyword. –  Ilmari Karonen Jan 8 '13 at 8:20
    
@IlmariKaronen: ah, right. Good point! –  a_horse_with_no_name Jan 8 '13 at 8:21
1  
@Phil: It should be enough to remove p.id from the group by clause, so that you just have group by c.id (and remove the p.id as picture_id part too, or maybe replace it with count(distinct p.id) as count_pictures). –  Ilmari Karonen Jan 8 '13 at 12:10

You could do this with subselects:

SELECT
  collections.*,
  ( SELECT COUNT(*) FROM pictures, likes
    WHERE pictures.id = likes.picture_id
      AND pictures.collection_id = collection.id
  ) AS like_count,
  ( SELECT COUNT(*) FROM pictures, views
    WHERE pictures.id = views.picture_id
      AND pictures.collection_id = collection.id
  ) AS view_count,
  ( SELECT COUNT(*) FROM pictures, comments
    WHERE pictures.id = comments.picture_id
      AND pictures.collection_id = collection.id
  ) AS comment_count
FROM collections
WHERE ...

This looks like it's going over the pictures table thrice, but I suspect that MySQL might be able to optimize that using the join buffer. I should note that I haven't actually tested this query, however. I also have no idea how this compares performance-wise with Barranka's LEFT JOIN solution. (Both would be pretty horrible if implemented naïvely, so it comes down to how smart MySQL's query optimizer is in each case.)

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