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I have to read a large text file and to parse it line by line using C#. It could be done easily with StreamReader for small sized file but it caught out of memory exception while working with large file. How can I adapt it for large files?

Following code catches OutOfMemoryException :

using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(FileNameWithPath))
{
    while ((line = reader.ReadLine()) != null)
    {
        // Do something here...
    }
}
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1  
Which line catches Exception? This code looks fine for me. –  Soner Gönül Jan 8 '13 at 8:14
    
How large is large? –  KMC Jan 8 '13 at 8:14
4  
the exception seems to be from "Do something here..." - so what exactly are you doing (some code please) ? –  Yahia Jan 8 '13 at 8:14
    
By realizing you totally misrepresent the facts. It is NOT the stream reader causing an out of memory exception, and not the reading, it is the code "// do something here" that we do not see. Naturally unless you have many hundred megabytes in one line. –  TomTom Jan 8 '13 at 8:17
    
I agree that it's likely to be a problem in // Do something here..., but also note that if you're using .Net 4 or later you can use File.ReadLines() to get a string enumerator that you can use with foreach. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd383503.aspx –  Matthew Watson Jan 8 '13 at 9:41
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4 Answers

That is pretty much the standard code for a lazy line reader, and shouldn't cause an OutOfMemoryException unless there are some really big single lines. You could also try:

foreach(var line in File.ReadLines(FileNameWithPath)) {
    // Do something here...
}

which just makes it cleaner, but does the same thing. So there are two options:

  1. one or more of the "lines" is simply huge
  2. something in "Do something here" is slowly (or quickly) eating your memory

I expect the latter is more likley.

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I am not sure with this but give try to this class of .net framework

MemoryMappedFile Class-A memory-mapped file maps the contents of a file to an application’s logical address space. Memory-mapped files enable programmers to work with extremely large files because memory can be managed concurrently, and they allow complete, random access to a file without the need for seeking. Memory-mapped files can also be shared across multiple processes.

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1  
while that is true, a StreamReader seems entirely appropriate for the situation described. –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 8:23
    
@MarcGravell - agree with you but i just read about this class few weeks ago ...but nit tried but this might helpfull... –  Pranay Rana Jan 8 '13 at 8:25
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using (var inputFile = new System.IO.StreamReader(sourceFilePath))
{
    while (inputFile.Peek() >= 0) {
        string lineData = inputFile.ReadLine();

        // Do something with lineData
    }
}
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That check is semantically identical to the null check in the code in the question –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 9:50
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How about specify the buffer size ?

like this.

using (var reader = new StreamWriter(path,false,Encoding.UTF8, 1000))
{
    .....

}
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The question is about a reader, not a writer –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 9:50
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