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How do you cast a List of objects from one type to another in Java?

Searched the internet a little, and found no nice way of doing it... My solution now is:

public class A {}
List<Object> obj = new ArrayList<Object>();
obj.add(new A());
// Ugly solution here:
List<A> a = (List<A>) (List) obj;

But this is quite ugly and gets a warning. No "official" way of doing this?

EDIT: To the guys who closed this: I was aware of the solution posted in How do you cast a List of objects from one type to another in Java? It is the same as the one I posted in my question (just adding the <?> after the first cast does exactly the same) I Was looking for something more "clean". In the direction of using the Class<?> clazz = listobj.get(0).getClass way of getting the class and casting to the correct class at runtime (but no idea if something like that works... Eclipse doesn't seem to like it anyway...)

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marked as duplicate by soulcheck, SztupY, Frank van Puffelen, Grizzly, Anders R. Bystrup Jan 8 '13 at 12:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Why are you creating a List<Object> in the first place? –  Adam Arold Jan 8 '13 at 9:38
    
@AdamArold Thank you for your answer. Yes I should have been more specific: The List<Object> come from the fact that I'm fetching in a database with JDBC and that I don't necessarily know the datatype that will come out. Obviously I'm not creating List<Object> for fun ^^ –  reverse_engineer Jan 8 '13 at 15:42

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted
List<Object> obj = new ArrayList<Object>();
obj.add(new A());

It is not the right way to write code. Basically you are creating a generic List and adding Object to it and it type unsafe and keep any Object type.

List<Object> obj = new ArrayList<Object>();
obj.add(new A());
obj.add(new String("str"));
obj.add(1);

It is recommended to create type-safe List like List<A> obj = new ArrayList<A>();

you can do this in such a way -

public <T>List<T> castCollection(List srcList, Class<T> clas){
    List<T> list =new ArrayList<T>();
    for (Object obj : srcList) {
    if(obj!=null && clas.isAssignableFrom(obj.getClass()))
        list.add(clas.cast(obj));
    }
    return list;
}
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Thank you for your answer. Yes I should have been more specific: The List<Object> come from the fact that I'm fetching in a database with JDBC and that I don't necessarily know the datatype that will come out. Obviously I'm not creating List<Object> for fun ^^ –  reverse_engineer Jan 8 '13 at 15:40
    
Answer updated. –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Jan 9 '13 at 5:36
    
Thank you for your answer. Yes this seems like a solution that will go in the direction that I like. I'll check it out. Since this is the best answer I got I'll validate it. Thanks! –  reverse_engineer Jan 9 '13 at 9:15

So why isn't your list declared as

List<A> obj = new ArrayList<A>();

to begin with ?

It's really dangerous to do what you're trying to do. What you're saying is that your list contains As and subclasses thereof. But since it's originally a list of Objects (i.e. anything). You're likely to get a nasty surprise later on.

What that compiler error really means is that somewhere you have a design issue.

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2  
Downvoted why ? –  Brian Agnew Jan 8 '13 at 9:40
3  
+1 This is the nice way of doing it, even if it's not what the OP is looking for. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 8 '13 at 9:44
    
@BrianAgnew Thank you for your answer. Yes maybe I'm having a design flaw then, but when I use apache's commons-dbutils-1.5.jar for JDBC, I designed it that way that it can fetch any data type from databases. Hence the List<Object>. But for later use, I need to cast them to their java type... Am I using JDBC completely wrong here then? (I have no experience with it, just started coding :)) –  reverse_engineer Jan 8 '13 at 15:35

Perhaps the issue is that you want to put objects of different (but inheritance-related) types into the list? In that case, you read the Generics Tutorial, especially the parts about <? extends Something> and <? super Something>

Cheers,

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