Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a project in C that I need to modify and run. At some point, in a source file I have

#ifndef THE_FLAG
// declare important stuff
#endif

but, I don't know where THE_FLAG is #included from. It is not defined in my project, and it is hidden somewhere in external library.

I tried gcc -M but it shows the headers, without information if it was included directly or somewhere higher in the include hierarchy.

The project is too complicated to track all the dependencies by hand. It is build with ./configure && make.

Question: how to track this external dependency?

share|improve this question
    
Is it really THE_FLAG, or did you just use that as an example? If the name is sufficiently unique-sounding, I'd just grep all header files on the system for it. –  Chris Jan 8 '13 at 9:50
    
Just example :) –  Jakub M. Jan 8 '13 at 9:52
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try compiling with gcc -E. This will tell gcc to stop at the preprocessing stage. As part of that, it will tell you where all the #defines came from.

Note that this will create a text file, not a .o file.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You can get gcc to tell you exactly where the flag is defined by redefining it for test purposes, e.g.

#include <limits.h>

#define INT_MAX 42

int f(void)
{
        return INT_MAX;
}

will make gcc complain

main.c:4:0: warning: "INT_MAX" redefined [enabled by default]
 #define INT_MAX 42
 ^
In file included from main.c:2:0:
/usr/lib/gcc/x86_64-redhat-linux/4.8.1/include/limits.h:120:0: note: this is the location of the previous definition
 #define INT_MAX __INT_MAX__
 ^

The same strategy also works well for finding struct definitions (very useful in case you have several architect specific header files and you are not sure which one is actually used!).

#include <stdio.h>

typedef void FILE;

void f(void)
{
}

gives

main.c:3:14: error: conflicting types for ‘FILE’
 typedef void FILE;
              ^
In file included from main.c:1:0:
/usr/include/stdio.h:48:25: note: previous declaration of ‘FILE’ was here
 typedef struct _IO_FILE FILE;
                         ^
share|improve this answer
add comment

gcc -E will give us the output after preprocessor. But sometimes it will be difficult for a developer to verify if the .c file is very big and including some big header files. In such cases checking build output will be easier. #warning will print the message as warning during compilation.

#ifndef THE_FLAG
#warning "including ABC stuff"
// declare important stuff
#endif

We can make compiler warnings using #pragma also, but its not platform independent.

#pragma "including ABC stuff"

If we want to stop the compilation if some unwanted macros has been defined somewhere, we can use #error.

#ifdef UNWANTED_FLAG
#error "Build stopped. UNWANTED flag has been defined"
#endif
share|improve this answer
    
This will only tell you that the flag has been defined, but it won't tell you where it was defined. –  Nathan Fellman Jan 8 '13 at 13:10
    
@NathanFellman Everytime we may not need to find from where its defined. Most of the times we need to know whether its defined or not. I answed by considering this scenario also. –  raja ashok Jan 8 '13 at 13:25
    
Your is a good answer to a different question. It doesn't answer the OP's question. –  Nathan Fellman Jan 8 '13 at 14:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.