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In Javascript in particular, it is common for APIs to expose functions that accept either strings or functions for a specific argument. Strings provide "already initialized" values, while functions produce values at run-time.

// Call foo with known value
api.foo('bar')
// or defer value determination to run-time
api.foo(function() { return 'bar'; }

This is more flexible are sometimes the arguments to pass to these API calls are not known until runtime, e.g.

api.foo(function() { return prompt('foo or bar ?'); });

This method would be somewhat reserved to public-facing functions (because they introduce more complex signatures and may have gotchas - best to keep their number low), but still, what is a good idiom for writing such functions ?

Something along the lines of

api = {
  // "public" function
  func: function(a) {
    if (typeof(a) == 'function')
      return this._func(a());
    else
      return this._func(a);
  },
  // Actual implementation
  _func: function(a) {
    [...]
  }
}

should work but there are certainly more efficient/elegant alternatives. Any ideas ?

UPDATE: Following comments by @camus (and an answer that has now disappeared but was relevant), here is an update clarifying my intentions and explaining how this relates to APIs

Consider that when writing the function we do not know which way it is going to be called, and we don't want to place restrictive assumptions on it. The function is designed to be versatile, so it can be called multiple times using different signatures. We could force the caller to use strings, but it can be convenient to let a function that returns a string do the job. This function could be passed additional parameters (like an index, ...) and this is of course very specific to the context of the API, but the general idea is rather "how to I process strings and functions-that-return-a-string arguments in an elegant manner?".

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You're in good company with that solution: jQuery's on event binding is implemented like this: github.com/jquery/jquery/blob/… Basically a nested if/else to sort out the calling mess. –  Boldewyn Jan 8 '13 at 9:57
    
what is the point executing the function right away ? a function passed as an argument should be used as a continuation or it makes no sense. why not just do fun(my_func()) in the code directly then ... in the first exemple it ( "defer value determination to run-time") it makes little sense too , because you'll have to use closures to change the result of the passed function. The result of the passed function is predictable in most cases. –  mpm Jan 8 '13 at 9:59
    
You should not start your variables with an underscore (_), because an underscore is usually refering to a private variable, which _func is not. –  Amberlamps Jan 8 '13 at 10:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I'd go with :

api = {
  func: function(a) {
    if(typeof a == 'function') a = a.call(this); // Transmit api as scope for a, may be useful for accessing api tools ...

    // Process a ...
  }
};
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Passing arguments to the function is indeed a very useful thing to do. Some APIs will transmit their specific context using this as you suggest, but also an index (for data collections), or anything that is relevant in their scope. –  Tibo Jan 8 '13 at 10:32
    
Accepting this answer because @yent needs more rep than @Barmar :) Actually, because of the this argument - which is a nice forethought the question did not call for. –  Tibo Jan 10 '13 at 10:10

Here's a simple way to implement it:

api = {
  // "public" function
  func: function(a) {
    if (typeof a == 'function') {
      a = a();
    }
    // rest of function
  }
}
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1  
It’s typeof a (no parentheses) –  David Jan 8 '13 at 9:57
    
I think it will work either way, but I fixed it. –  Barmar Jan 8 '13 at 9:59
    
@David: I've been using typeof() for a long time without realizing. Thanks. –  Tibo Jan 8 '13 at 10:33
api = {
  func: function( a ) {
    typeof a == 'function' && a.call( this, arguments ); 
  }
};
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