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I have a parent class A and 2 derived class A1 and A2:

class A {

}

class A1 : public class A {}

class A2 : public class A {}

And in another class B I want to keep a collection, which is composed of objects A1 or A2.

class B {
    vector<A1> _A1s;
    vector<A2> _A2s;

}

Rather than keep 2 separate vectors A1s and A2s, is there a way to combine these 2 vectors? I thought about vector or vector, but either way may lost objects when A1s or A2s resize (I assume).

Any idea?

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You may want to rethink over the pros/cons of storing pointers to A in the container, over maintaining two separate vectors –  Chubsdad Jan 8 '13 at 10:07
    
I think you should work more on your understanding of inheritance in C++; this topic appears to be rather new to you, chances are that you don't even want any inheritance whatsoever in the first place (beginners tend to over-use inheritance in C++). –  Frerich Raabe Jan 8 '13 at 10:16
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use a vector of smart pointers to base type

std::vector<std::shared_ptr<A>> a_ptr;

Note: You need to add virtual destructor to A

class A {
public:
  virtual ~A() {}
};

usage:

struct B {
public:
  B() {
    a_ptr.push_back(std::shared_ptr<A>(new A1));
    a_ptr.push_back(std::shared_ptr<A>(new A2));
  }

private:
  std::vector<std::shared_ptr<A>> a_ptr;
};

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  B b;
  return 0;
}

Also you miss ; after class definition and you have extra keyword class in front of A in below statement:

class A1 : public class A {};

should be:

class A1 : public A {};
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Good answer. But let me add something: After adding the instances of A1 / A2 and others to the vector, you won't know which elements point to the base or to which derived class. There's a simple way to find out: Add a virtual method like "std::string getType()" to the base class and its derived classes. Every class returns its identifier string. So when interpreting the the vector, you can use this method to identify whats behind the A pointer and do for example a static_cast to get the whole instance. –  Gombat Jan 8 '13 at 10:22
    
right. with a reference count increase, the object won't be deleted. I think shared_ptr is what I am after. Thanks –  eltonsky Jan 8 '13 at 10:47
    
BTW, I tried to search in vector<shared_ptr<A>>. Is there easy way to do that? I know I can implement a operator== for a vector<A>. How about this guy? –  eltonsky Jan 8 '13 at 11:11
    
you need iterator to access stl container, sees sample from : cplusplus.com/reference/vector/vector/begin –  billz Jan 8 '13 at 11:21
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You can use a vector of pointer

class B {
public:
    std::vector<A*>   _AXs;
};

It will accept both A1 and A2 pointer types.

Note that in this case, you should set the destructor of the A class virtual. If you don't, when you try to delete a A* objet, the program can't guess what is the real type.

class A {
public:
    virtual ~A() {}    
};
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You can use what the others say, plus a design pattern called visitor if you want to still be able to use the underlying A pointer as a A1 or A2. The visitor pattern is not really designed for that but it’s nice to use it that way.

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