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I am trying to implement Singly Linked List. I am not able to compile the following code. I have removed lot of unnecessary code which is not relevant for this question from the below snippet:

public class SinglyLinkedList<T>
{
    public SinglyLinkedList()
    {
    }

    private SinglyNode<T> _head = null;

    private class SinglyNode<T>
    {
        public T Data { get; set; }
        public SinglyNode<T> Next { get; set; }
    }

    private class Enumerator<T>
    {
        public Enumerator(SinglyLinkedList<T> list)
        {
            _list = list; //#1
            _head = list._head; //#2
        }

        private SinglyLinkedList<T> _list = null;
        private SinglyNode<T> _head = null;
    }
}

The statement marked #2 is failing with the error - Cannot implicitly convert type 'SinglyLinkedList<T>.SinglyNode<T>' to 'SinglyLinkedList<T>.SinglyNode<T> Program.cs

The statement marked #1 is semantically similar to #2 and it is compiling. What is stopping the program to compile? Are there any genercis + inner classes related rules that are causing the above code to not compile?

Please make a note that the above code snippet is part of my learning by reinventing the wheel and is not a production code.

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1  
Drop the <T> in SinglyNode<T> and Enumerator<T> –  CodesInChaos Jan 8 '13 at 10:07
    
I'm a bit surprised that C# allows this kind of generic parameter shadowing. –  CodesInChaos Jan 8 '13 at 10:09
    
@CodesInChaos it does, however, tell you that it is probably a mistake: the code in the question has two of: "warning CS0693: Type parameter 'T' has the same name as the type parameter from outer type 'SinglyLinkedList<T>'" –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 10:12
    
@Anand - it is always worth reading the compiler warnings ^^^ –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 10:13
    
@MarcGravell - Yes Marc. I did not focused on warnings because there were errors. I will keep that in mind. –  Anand Patel Jan 8 '13 at 10:15
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1 Answer

up vote 8 down vote accepted

The inner classes each declare their own completely different T.

Just remove the T from the inner classes and all will be well:

public class SinglyLinkedList<T>
{
    public SinglyLinkedList()
    {
    }

    private SinglyNode _head = null;

    private class SinglyNode
    {
        public T Data { get; set; }
        public SinglyNode Next { get; set; }
    }

    private class Enumerator
    {
        public Enumerator(SinglyLinkedList<T> list)
        {
            _list = list; //#1
            _head = list._head; //#2
        }

        private SinglyLinkedList<T> _list = null;
        private SinglyNode _head = null;
    }
}
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I think you should remove it also on public SinglyNode<T> Next { get; set; } –  trippino Jan 8 '13 at 10:10
    
I saw that in the C# warnings :) –  MBen Jan 8 '13 at 10:10
    
@trippino fixed; now compiles –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 10:11
    
@MarcGravell - I will mark your response as answer. Would it be possible for you to put the rule in a plain English and provide some more explanation? That will help me and other developers like me to get the hold of the actual rule. –  Anand Patel Jan 8 '13 at 10:21
1  
@AnandPatel the "rule" there is simply: nested classes automatically inherit any generic type parameters from their parent types; so SinglyNode is already generic - but via the parent. It is SinglyLinkedList<T>.SinglyNode; a SinglyLinkedList<int>.SinglyNode is a different type to a SinglyLinkedList<string>.SinglyNode –  Marc Gravell Jan 8 '13 at 10:28
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