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I have a class named Person with multiple properties, for example:

public class Person {
    private int id;
    private String name, address;
    // Many more properties.
}

A lot of Person-objects are stored in an ArrayList<Person>. I want to sort this list by multiple sort parameters, and different from time to time. For instance I might one time want to sort by name ascending and then address descending, and another time just by id descending.

And I don't want to create my own sort methods (i.e., I want to use Collections.sort(personList, someComparator). What is the most elegant solution that achieves this?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 114 down vote accepted

I think your enum approach is basically sound, but the switch statements really need a more object oriented approach. Consider:

enum PersonComparator implements Comparator<Person> {
    ID_SORT {
        public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {
            return Integer.valueOf(o1.getId()).compareTo(o2.getId());
        }},
    NAME_SORT {
        public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {
            return o1.getFullName().compareTo(o2.getFullName());
        }};

    public static Comparator<Person> decending(final Comparator<Person> other) {
        return new Comparator<Person>() {
            public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {
                return -1 * other.compare(o1, o2);
            }
        };
    }

    public static Comparator<Person> getComparator(final PersonComparator... multipleOptions) {
        return new Comparator<Person>() {
            public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {
                for (PersonComparator option : multipleOptions) {
                    int result = option.compare(o1, o2);
                    if (result != 0) {
                        return result;
                    }
                }
                return 0;
            }
        };
    }
}

An example of usage (with a static import).

public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<Person> list = null;
    Collections.sort(list, decending(getComparator(NAME_SORT, ID_SORT)));
}
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7  
+1 smart use of enums. I like the elegant combination you do with the enums, the "descending" and the "Composite". I guess the null values treatment is missing, but it's easy to add the same way as "descending". –  KLE Sep 15 '09 at 7:48
    
Many nice answers providing food for thought. Since no answer stood out as the clear alternative, I'm gonna accept this one because I like the elegance, but I urge anyone viewing this answer to check the other approaches as well. –  runaros Sep 15 '09 at 21:31
    
@Yishai I don't understand. –  Cosmin Vacaroiu Jul 12 '11 at 13:57
    
@Cosmin, if you have a specific question, you could ask it on StackOverflow as a new question referencing this answer. –  Yishai Jul 22 '11 at 16:56
1  
@TheLittleNaruto, the compare method returns a negative number if o2 is greater, a positive one if o1 is greater, and zero if they are equal. Multiplying by -1 reverses the result, which is the idea of decending (the opposite of the usual ascending order), while leaving it as zero if they were equal. –  Yishai Dec 4 '13 at 14:05

You can create comparators for each of properties you might want to sort and then try "comparator chaining" :-) like this:

public class ChainedComparator<T> implements Comparator<T> {
    private List<Comparator<T>> simpleComparators; 
    public ChainedComparator(Comparator<T>... simpleComparators) {
        this.simpleComparators = Arrays.asList(simpleComparators);
    }
    public int compare(T o1, T o2) {
        for (Comparator<T> comparator : simpleComparators) {
            int result = comparator.compare(o1, o2);
            if (result != 0) {
                return result;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    }
}
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You are probably going to get a warning when that is used (although in JDK7 you should be able to suppress it). –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 14 '09 at 15:09
    
I really really like this one. –  pimpf0r Sep 15 '09 at 7:36
    
I like this as well. Can you provide a sample on how to use this with the given example? –  runaros Sep 15 '09 at 21:32
    
@runaros: Using the comparators from KLE's answer: Collections.sort(/* Collection<Person> */ people, new ChainedComparator(NAME_ASC_ADRESS_DESC, ID_DESC)); –  Janus Troelsen Oct 20 '11 at 8:33

One way is to create a Comparator that takes as arguments a list of properties to sort by, as this example shows.

public class Person {
    private int id;
    private String name, address;

    public static Comparator<Person> getComparator(SortParameter... sortParameters) {
        return new PersonComparator(sortParameters);
    }

    public enum SortParameter {
        ID_ASCENDING, ID_DESCENDING, NAME_ASCENDING,
        NAME_DESCENDING, ADDRESS_ASCENDING, ADDRESS_DESCENDING
    }

    private static class PersonComparator implements Comparator<Person> {
        private SortParameter[] parameters;

        private PersonComparator(SortParameter[] parameters) {
            this.parameters = parameters;
        }

        public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {
            int comparison;
            for (SortParameter parameter : parameters) {
                switch (parameter) {
                    case ID_ASCENDING:
                        comparison = o1.id - o2.id;
                        if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
                        break;
                    case ID_DESCENDING:
                        comparison = o2.id - o1.id;
                        if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
                        break;
                    case NAME_ASCENDING:
                        comparison = o1.name.compareTo(o2.name);
                        if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
                        break;
                    case NAME_DESCENDING:
                        comparison = o2.name.compareTo(o1.name);
                        if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
                        break;
                    case ADDRESS_ASCENDING:
                        comparison = o1.address.compareTo(o2.address);
                        if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
                        break;
                    case ADDRESS_DESCENDING:
                        comparison = o2.address.compareTo(o1.address);
                        if (comparison != 0) return comparison;
                        break;
                }
            }
            return 0;
        }
    }
}

It can then be used in code for instance like this:

cp = Person.getComparator(Person.SortParameter.ADDRESS_ASCENDING,
                          Person.SortParameter.NAME_DESCENDING);
Collections.sort(personList, cp);
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1  
You appear to have answered this yourself immediately after answering the question?! –  Brian Agnew Sep 14 '09 at 12:59
    
Yes. If you want your code to be very generic, your enum could specify only the property to read (you could use reflection to get the property using the enum name), and you could specify the rest with a second enum: ASC & DESC, and possibly a third (NULL_FIRST or NULL_LAST). –  KLE Sep 14 '09 at 13:06
    
I smell abuse. This would deserve a down vote... –  Pascal Thivent Sep 14 '09 at 13:20
4  
@Pascal, I don't agree, the FAQ specifically encourages answering your own question. –  Yishai Sep 14 '09 at 13:28
3  
I answered it myself because that is a possible solutions. I'm sure there are better solutions, hence the question. –  runaros Sep 14 '09 at 13:35

One approach would be to compose Comparators. This could be a library method (I'm sure it exists somewhere out there).

public static <T> Comparator<T> compose(
    final Comparator<? super T> primary,
    final Comparator<? super T> secondary
) {
    return Comparator<T> {
        public int compare(T a, T b) {
            int result = primary.compare(a, b);
            return result==0 ? secondary.compare(a, b) : result;
        }
        [...]
    }
}

Use:

Collections.sort(people, compose(nameComparator, addressComparator));

Alternatively, note that Collections.sort is a stable sort. If performance isn't absolutely crucial, you sort be the secondary order before the primary.

Collections.sort(people, addressComparator);
Collections.sort(people, nameComparator);
share|improve this answer
    
Clever approach, however, could it be made more generic, such that it includes a variable number of comparators, possibly including zero? –  runaros Sep 14 '09 at 14:39
    
compose(nameComparator, compose(addressComparator, idComparator)) That would read a little better if Java had extension methods. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Sep 14 '09 at 15:08

Comparators lets you do that very easily and naturally. You can create single instances of comparators, either in your Person class itself, or in a Service class associated to your need.
Examples, using anonymous inner classes:

    public static final Comparator<Person> NAME_ASC_ADRESS_DESC
     = new Comparator<Person>() {
      public int compare(Person p1, Person p2) {
         int nameOrder = p1.getName().compareTo(p2.getName);
         if(nameOrder != 0) {
           return nameOrder;
         }
         return -1 * p1.getAdress().comparedTo(p2.getAdress());
         // I use explicit -1 to be clear that the order is reversed
      }
    };

    public static final Comparator<Person> ID_DESC
     = new Comparator<Person>() {
      public int compare(Person p1, Person p2) {
         return -1 * p1.getId().comparedTo(p2.getId());
         // I use explicit -1 to be clear that the order is reversed
      }
    };
    // and other comparator instances as needed...


If you have many, you can also structure your comparators code any way you like. For example, you could:

  • inherit from another comparator,
  • have a CompositeComparator that agregates some existing comparators
  • have a NullComparator that handle null cases, then delegates to another comparator
  • etc...
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I think coupling the sorters to the Person class, like in your answer, isn't a good idea, because it couples the comparison (usually business driven) and the model object to close to each other. Each time you want to change/add something the sorter, you need to touch the person class, which is usually something you do not want to do.

Using a Service or something similar, which provides Comparator instances, like KLE proposed, sounds way more flexible and extensible.

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Thanks for the pointer. –  KLE Sep 14 '09 at 13:32
    
Sound reasonable, thanks for the input :) –  runaros Sep 14 '09 at 13:41
    
As for me this leads to tight coupling because somehow the comparators holder class HAS to know the detailed data structure of a Person class (basically which fields of Person class to compare) and if you ever gonna change something in Persons fields this leads to trace same changes in comparators class. I guess Person comparators should be a part of a Person class. blog.sanaulla.info/2008/06/26/… –  Stan Jul 27 at 15:48

I recently wrote a Comparator to sort multiple fields within a delimited String record. It allows you to define the delimiter, record structure and sorting rules (some of which are type-specific). You can use this by converting a Person record into a delimited String.

Required information is seeded to the Comparator itself, either programmatically or through an XML file.

XML is validated by a package embedded XSD file. For example, below is a tab delimited record layout with four fields (two of which are sortable):

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?> 
<row xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance">

    <delimiter>&#009;</delimiter>

    <column xsi:type="Decimal">
        <name>Column One</name>
    </column>

    <column xsi:type="Integer">
        <name>Column Two</name>
    </column>

    <column xsi:type="String">
        <name>Column Three</name>
        <sortOrder>2</sortOrder>
        <trim>true</trim>
        <caseSensitive>false</caseSensitive>        
        <stripAccents>true</stripAccents>
    </column>

    <column xsi:type="DateTime">
        <name>Column Four</name>
        <sortOrder>1</sortOrder>
        <ascending>true</ascending>
        <nullLowSortOrder>true</nullLowSortOrder>
        <trim>true</trim>
        <pattern>yyyy-MM-dd</pattern>
    </column>

</row>

You would then use this in java like so:

Comparator<String> comparator = new RowComparator(
              new XMLStructureReader(new File("layout.xml")));

Library can be found here:

http://sourceforge.net/projects/multicolumnrowcomparator/

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protected by Perception Nov 28 '12 at 8:01

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