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I want to use both InCell editing in DataTable and the validation. I know that the trivial validations can be solved with f:validator, but what with non-trivial names?

I must, let's say, assure that the 'name' property is unique in the table. So, before accepting the edit, I should check if the name is changed and if it is used by another element. If so, the edit must be refused.

How to achieve it? The eventListener would be only notified that the edit was accepted, as I have understood, so theoretically I could react and revert it, but I would prefer to refuse the edit when user clicks the 'accept' icon.

share|improve this question
    
why can't you do it in f:validator validatorId="myNonTrivialValidator" ? , just write your own custom validator with your logic... –  Daniel Jan 8 '13 at 11:58
    
would such validator have access to given data bean, or table content? I thought validators have access only to the field they are placed in –  Danubian Sailor Jan 8 '13 at 12:02
    
additionally, we don't use jsf validators because they are activated on form level, on every submit and are harder to control than custom code. but anyway, jsf validator validates single field only, and validation can be dependent on multiple fields –  Danubian Sailor Jan 8 '13 at 12:06
    
it can access your session scope bean and should also access view bean... –  Daniel Jan 8 '13 at 12:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Like Daniel said, you can use a JSF validator for this. A short example:

Assume we have a person:

public class Person
{
    // Just imagine getters and setters ;-)
    private String firstName, lastName;
}

And a very simple backing bean:

@ManagedBean
@ViewScoped
public class PersonBean
{
    private List<Person> persons = new ArrayList<Person>();

    @PostConstruct
    private void init()
    {
        persons.add(new Person("John", "Doe"));
    }   
}

For example we want to ensure the first name starts with an uppercase letter. We don't care if the last name doesn't start with an uppercase letter (because of compatibility with IE or a legacy database, you know, the usual weirdness).

@FacesValidator("firstNameValidator")
public class FirstNameValidator implements javax.faces.validator.Validator
{
    @Override
    public void validate(FacesContext context, UIComponent component,
        Object value) throws ValidatorException
    {
        if (!Character.isUpperCase(String.valueOf(value).charAt(0)))
        {
            FacesMessage msg = new FacesMessage("First name should start with a capital.");
            throw new ValidatorException(msg);
        }
    }

}

Now to display everything nicely:

<p:growl id="growl" />
<h:form>
    <p:dataTable value="#{bean.persons}" var="person" editable="true">
        <p:ajax event="rowEdit" update=":growl"/>
        <p:column headerText="first name">
            <p:cellEditor>
                <f:facet name="output">
                    <h:outputText value="#{person.firstName}" />
                </f:facet>
                <f:facet name="input">
                    <p:inputText validator="firstNameValidator"
                        value="#{person.firstName}" />
                </f:facet>
            </p:cellEditor>
        </p:column>
        <p:column headerText="last name">
            <p:cellEditor>
                <f:facet name="output">
                    <h:outputText value="#{person.lastName}" />
                </f:facet>
                <f:facet name="input">
                    <p:inputText value="#{person.lastName}" />
                </f:facet>
            </p:cellEditor>
        </p:column>
        <p:column>
            <p:rowEditor />
        </p:column>
    </p:dataTable>
</h:form>

If you're interested, validation can be configured on domain-level by using bean validation (JSR-303). I strongly recommend it since it doesn't depend on JSF and it integrates with JPA.


Update as promised using bean validation:

First, the validator:

public class FirstNameValidator implements ConstraintValidator<FirstUpper, String>
{
    @Override
    public void initialize(FirstUpper constraintAnnotation) { }

    @Override
    public boolean isValid(String value, ConstraintValidatorContext context)
    {
        return Character.isUpperCase(value.charAt(0));
    }

}

The annotation we're going to use:

@Constraint(validatedBy = FirstNameValidator.class)
@Target({ ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.FIELD })
@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
public @interface FirstUpper
{
    String message() default "{FirstUpper.message}";

    Class<?>[] groups() default {};

    Class<? extends Payload>[] payload() default {};
}

Note that the message we declared "{FirstUpper.message}" will be resolved to a resource bundle. The bundle must be in the root of your classpath, named ValidationMessages.properties. To localize you can add a locale code: ValidationMessages_en.properties.

In that file declare the message:

FirstUpper.message=First name should start with a capital.

The person class:

public class Person
{
    @FirstUpper
    private String firstName;
    private String lastName;
    // Imagine the getters/setters again ;-)
}

And now, in your UI you don't have to refer to the validator, JSF is smart enough to validate using JSR-303. So instead of this:

<p:inputText validator="firstNameValidator" value="#{person.firstName}" />

Just use this:

<p:inputText value="#{person.firstName}" />

Easy right? ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
But still, this is entity-level validator, and not entity-set-level validator, so the most trivial case –  Danubian Sailor Jan 9 '13 at 5:45
    
The problem with Hibernate Validator (I think you're referring him) is that is has dependencies having JBoss license, which can't be simply used in commercial programs without fee (at least legal department have found it so) –  Danubian Sailor Jan 9 '13 at 8:29
    
Hibernate validator is an implementation of JSR-303. There are multiple out there like Apache commons validation (probably Apache license) and Slring framework.You can use vanilla JavaEE bean validation too. In the package javax.validation are some already. –  siebz0r Jan 9 '13 at 9:52
    
I'm not able now (since I'm on my mobile), but I'll write a short example later. ;-) –  siebz0r Jan 9 '13 at 9:54
    
@lechlukasz I've updated my answer. Free to use, no licenses here ;-) –  siebz0r Jan 9 '13 at 11:01

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