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I've found some android code (link):

   public void getSize(Point outSize) {
      synchronized (this) {
          updateDisplayInfoLocked();
          mDisplayInfo.getAppMetrics(mTempMetrics, mCompatibilityInfo);
          outSize.x = mTempMetrics.widthPixels;
          outSize.y = mTempMetrics.heightPixels;
      }
   }

And just wondering - what made the author of this piece to implement it in a such way? (Why does it modify the parameter instead of returning new object? Get-methods are normally dumb, have return values, and don't modify parameters. Am I wrong?)

The only reason I can get from top of my head is - efficiency. User of this method could control the number of Point objects created. But is it a good practice designing such API?

UPD:

I would implement it like this (or smth similar):

   public Point getSize() {
      Point outSize = new Point();
      synchronized (this) {
          updateDisplayInfoLocked();
          mDisplayInfo.getAppMetrics(mTempMetrics, mCompatibilityInfo);
          outSize.x = mTempMetrics.widthPixels;
          outSize.y = mTempMetrics.heightPixels;
      }
      return outSize;
   }
share|improve this question
    
Looking at the code; if they didn't use this kind of approach there were 3 new objects created. Two for getAppMetrics (well, this is the only way to return two parameters using single get). And one Point object. Personally I'd say they did the correct choice of design. – harism Jan 8 '13 at 12:10
    
@harism, I've added another piece of code - just one more object, but now it looks more normal. Doesn't it? – Anders D Jan 8 '13 at 12:15
    
mDisplayInfo.getAppMetrics is a void getter too. Once you replace it with a getter returning new object(s) too you get the idea recycling is a good practice in some cases. – harism Jan 8 '13 at 12:28
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If this method is called a lot, removing unnecessary object creation can dramatically improve performance. When you start looking at low-level code and methods that get called a lot, you start making these kind of optimizations.

The problem with a method like getSize() is that you'd really like to return a primitive. If getSize() returned an int this wouldn't be an issue. In cases like this it is pretty common for a parameter to be passed to the method to be used as an "output parameter".

In J2ME we did this kind of thing all the time. Especially for returning x/y coordinates. In that case you have 2 options that don't cause object creation:

  1. Create 2 methods: int getX() and int getY() OR
  2. Create a single method that writes the X and Y coordinate into a passed parameter like this: void getXY(int[] coords)

In the second method, the caller allocates an int[2] array once (probably static) and then the getXY() method can be called again and again using the same array to pass the coordinates around.

share|improve this answer
    
Solution 1 (2 getters) can create problems in a multi-threaded program: if the point changes between the call to getX and getY you get a point that is a mix of 2 points... – assylias Jan 8 '13 at 12:42
    
@assylias exactly! So you might need to synchronize the block containing the 2 method calls. Not only that, but having to make 2 method calls to get the 2 coordinates is also inefficient. The second solution is the one we usually use(d). – David Wasser Jan 8 '13 at 12:47

The reason is efficiency. In the way it is written the user of this method can recycle the point instance and avoid memory allocations. The method is probably often used in the draw code of views and it is important here to be as fast as possible for a smooth UI experience.

Allocating new objects also means that the GC has to kick in more often.

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As others have noted, and as you suspect, the author likely did it this way for efficiency.

Java convention says a method named getXXX should take no arguments and return a value.
A getter should also preferably have no side-effects.

He should have given the method a different name.

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