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data BTree a = Empty | Node (BTree a) a (BTree a) -- This is a node-labelled binary tree

Could someone please explain be the following Haskell functions?

  1. labels :: BTree a -> [a]

    labels Empty = []
    labels (Node left label right) = labels left ++ [label] ++ labels right
    
  2. reflect :: BTree a -> BTree a

    reflect Empty = Empty
    reflect (Node left label right) = Node (reflect left) label (reflect right)
    
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What do you think they do? What happens when you run them on a small example tree? –  Useless Jan 8 '13 at 12:21
3  
-1: Listen to what Useless says. Before asking a question, please show some of your thought process behind the question. You learn so much more, if you make an effort to think about the answer. If you don't, then you will miss a lot of the fun in programming. –  Boris Jan 8 '13 at 13:57
    
Is this homework? –  augustss Jan 8 '13 at 14:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

First: some formatting. This is how this code would typically be formatted in Haskell:

data BTree a = Empty 
             | Node (BTree a) a (BTree a)

labels :: BTree a -> [a]
labels Empty                   = [] 
labels (Node left label right) = labels left ++ [label] ++ labels right

reflect :: BTree a -> BTree a
reflect Empty                   = Empty 
reflect (Node left label right) = Node (reflect left) label (reflect right)

(Hint: if you indent code by 4 spaces it will show up properly syntax highlighted). Now let's go through it:

data BTree a = Empty 
             | Node (BTree a) a (BTree a)

Defines a new 'parametric' data type. It is called parametric because of the small a which is a type parameter. This means that a can be replaced by any other type, for example Int, Double, String, or whatever. Think templates in C++ or generics in Java. Empty and Node are called the constructors of the data type. A BTree a can either be Empty or (that's what | symbolizes) contain a Node which contains a BTree a an a and another BTree a. The definition is recursive because the datatype (BTree a) shows up in its own definition.

labels :: BTree a -> [a]
labels Empty                   = [] 
labels (Node left label right) = labels left ++ [label] ++ labels right

labels collects all values that are contained in the tree. The first line is the type declaration: It takes a binary tree with a nodes (BTree a) and maps that to a list of as ([a]). The type alone already gives you a good idea of what might be going on.

The next two lines are what are called pattern matches. These are a it like case statements in other languages, you distinguish different possibilities and then choose the appropriate case (they are much more powerful though). You should note how they correspond exactly to the two constructors that BTree a has. If we are at an Empty node then we'll just return an empty list ([]). Otherwise we'll fall through to the next line and have a Node which must have a BTree a an a and a BTree a which we bind to left, label, and right. We might have called left, label and right whatever we wanted, but these are intuitive.

Now left and right are again of type BTree a so we can call labels on both and expect them to return a list of as, i.e. [a]. So labels is also recursive because it calls itself in its definition. This is a very powerful technique which is used a lot in Haskell. labels then concatenates the list it got from labels left, one which only contains the current label ([label]) and then one it got from labels right. So we can effectively conclude that it joins the labels from the left subtree with the current label and the ones from the right subtree and puts it all into a list.

reflect :: BTree a -> BTree a
reflect Empty                   = Empty 
reflect (Node left label right) = Node (reflect left) label (reflect right)

Works pretty much the same way as labels, except that it returns a tree of the labels and not a list. So effectively, this does nothing, it is a bit of an expensive identity function. But it is a template for something more powerful. For example, you could quite easily pass another function to reflect and apply it to each of its elements.

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I think the second equation of reflect was meant to be reflect (Node left label right) = Node (reflect right) label (reflect left) and the OP mis-copied. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 8 '13 at 14:24
    
Yes, that is quite possible, given the effort ... –  Paul Jan 8 '13 at 14:38

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