Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a hash like this:

config = {
  :assets => {
    :path => '/assets',
    :aliases => {
      '/assets/' => '/assets/index.html',
      '/assets/index.htm' => '/assets/index.html'
    }
  },
  :api => {
    :path => '/auth/api',
    :aliases => {
      '/auth/api/me' => '/auth/api/whoami'
    }
  }
}

Is it possible to remove duplicates and have config[...][:aliases] assigned in terms of config[...][:path] like "#{dict_im_in()[:path]}/index.html"?

share|improve this question
    
you can handle this in the application. Store alias as /index.html and when you read the config, combine it with value of :path. –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 8 '13 at 12:33
    
You can, but not inline (to my knowledge). You'll have to add them after loading up. Do what Sergio suggests, but instead of combining it every time, at application startup go through each key-val pair in config and update the aliases in it by appending the :path where appropriate. –  Crisfole Jan 8 '13 at 12:42
    
Your example shows no duplication. Or am I missing something? –  tokland Jan 8 '13 at 14:15
1  
No. But you don't need to update data, use variables with subexpressions. –  tokland Jan 8 '13 at 14:18
    
@tokland paths prefixes (/assets, /auth/api) are duplicated, which for a large config will be error prone when updates are needed. –  Jan Wrobel Jan 8 '13 at 14:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you are trying to do smells of premature optimization. I'd recommend concentrating on using symbols as much as possible, both as keys and values, in your hash. Symbols are very memory efficient and fast to lookup because Ruby will only create one memory slot for a given symbol, effectively doing what you're trying to do.

Your example structure could be rewritten using symbols:

config = {
  :assets => {
    :path => :'/assets',
    :aliases => {
      :'/assets/' => :'/assets/index.html',
      :'/assets/index.htm' => :'/assets/index.html'
    }
  },
  :api => {
    :path => :'/auth/api',
    :aliases => {
      :'/auth/api/me' => :'/auth/api/whoami'
    }
  }
}

:'/assets/index.html', no matter where it's seen, would always point to the same symbol, unlike a string.

Any time you need to access a value in something expecting a string, do a to_s to it. When you add a value, do a to_sym to it.

Behind the scenes, you'll be using memory more efficiently in your Hash, and using what should be the fastest value lookup available in Ruby.

Now, if you're using a hash structure to configure your application, and it's being stored on disk, you can get some space savings using YAML, which supports aliases and anchors inside its data file. They won't make pointers inside the hash after parsing into a Ruby object, but they can reduce the size of the file.


EDIT:

If you need to dynamically define a configuration on the fly, then create variables for all the sub-parts of the various strings, then add a method that generates it. Here's the basics for dynamically creating such a thing:

require 'awesome_print'

def make_config(
  assets = '/assets',
  index_html = 'index.html',
  auth_api = '/auth/api'
)
  assets_index = File.join(assets, index_html)
  {
    :assets => {
      :path => assets,
      :aliases => {
        assets + '/' => assets_index,
        assets_index[0..-2] => assets_index
      }
    },
    :api => {
      :path => auth_api,
      :aliases => {
        File.join(auth_api, 'me') => File.join(auth_api, 'whoami')
      }
    }
  }
end

ap make_config()
ap make_config(
  '/new_assets',
  ['new','path','to','index.html'],
  '/auth/new_api'
)

With what would be generated:

{
    :assets => {
          :path  => "/assets",
        :aliases => {
                    "/assets/"  => "/assets/index.html",
            "/assets/index.htm" => "/assets/index.html"
        }
    },
      :api => {
          :path  => "/auth/api",
        :aliases => {
            "/auth/api/me" => "/auth/api/whoami"
        }
    }
}

and:

{
    :assets => {
          :path  => "/new_assets",
        :aliases => {
                                "/new_assets/"  => "/new_assets/new/path/to/index.html",
            "/new_assets/new/path/to/index.htm" => "/new_assets/new/path/to/index.html"
        }
    },
      :api => {
          :path  => "/auth/new_api",
        :aliases => {
            "/auth/new_api/me" => "/auth/new_api/whoami"
        }
    }
}

Edit:

An alternate way of duplicating value pointers, is to create lambdas or procs that return the information you want. I think of them like they're function pointers in C or Perl, allowing us to retain the state of a variable that was in scope, or to manipulate the passed-in values. This isn't a perfect solution, because of variable scoping that occurs, but it's another tool for the box:

lambda1 = lambda { 'bar' }
proc2   = Proc.new { |a,b| a + b }
proc3   = Proc.new { proc2.call(1,2) }

foo = {
  :key1 => lambda1,
  :key2 => proc2,
  :key3 => proc2,
  :key4 => proc3
}

foo[:key1].object_id # => 70222460767180
foo[:key2].object_id # => 70222460365960
foo[:key3].object_id # => 70222460365960
foo[:key4].object_id # => 70222460149600

foo[:key1].call          # => "bar"
foo[:key2].call(1, 2)    # => 3
foo[:key3].call(%w[a b]) # => "ab"
foo[:key4].call          # => 3

See "When to use lambda, when to use Proc.new?" for more information on lambdas and procs.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, I don't care about optimization at all, only about duplicated configuration. If I need to change '/assets/' to '/static/', I need to do it in multiple places. This is of course easy with a small config from the example, but in real life, with more advanced configuration, such duplication tends to be a source of errors. –  Jan Wrobel Jan 8 '13 at 14:55
    
OK, look at the edit. It's one way I've done it in the past. –  the Tin Man Jan 8 '13 at 15:21
    
I guess the answer to my question is that a value in a hash can not refer to some other values from the same hash. Your answers gives one way to workaround this, thus I'm accepting it. –  Jan Wrobel Jan 9 '13 at 16:45
    
I added another way that might seed ideas of how to get where you want to go. –  the Tin Man Jan 9 '13 at 18:17

This is an interesting question ;).

I think you could "reopen" the hash and then just use the variable name.

For example:

config = {
  :assets => {
    :path => '/assets',
    :aliases => {
      '/assets/' => '/assets/index.html',
      '/assets/index.htm' => '/assets/index.html'
    }
  }
}
# Then "re-open" the Hash
config[:api] = {
  :path => '/auth/api',
  :aliases => {
    '/auth/api/me' => config[:assets][:aliases]['/assets/index.htm']
  }
}

You could also write a helper method to extract a given alias from that hash. But I'm not sure if it's worth it.

share|improve this answer
    
How does this answer the question? –  Sergio Tulentsev Jan 8 '13 at 13:36
    
Hello Sergio, wasn't a question about how to refer to other values inside the hash itself? Maybe I didn't understand well. –  Aldo 'xoen' Giambelluca Jan 8 '13 at 17:22

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.