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Can An Array Be Added to Object? I have defined 2 Arrays itemId and itemName and pushed some values in them. Can these 2 arrays be pushed or be a part of ItemCatalog Object?

var ItemCatalog = new Object();

itemId = new Array();
itemName = new Array()

/*
var itemId = new Array();
var itemName = new Array();
*/
var currentItemIndex = 5;

itemId.push(1);
itemId.push(2);
itemId.push(3);
itemId.push(4);
itemId.push(5);
itemId.push(6);
itemId.push(7);
itemId.push(8);
itemId.push(9);
itemId.push(10);

itemName.push("A");
itemName.push("B");
itemName.push("C");
itemName.push("D");
itemName.push("E");
itemName.push("F");
itemName.push("G");
itemName.push("H");
itemName.push("I");
itemName.push("J");

Thanks, Ankit

share|improve this question
    
ItemCatalog.Names = itemName; –  AbdElRaheim Jan 8 '13 at 12:35
    
These two arrays pushed where? –  ryadavilli Jan 8 '13 at 12:35
    
I recommend to read some JavaScript tutorial, especially MDN - Working with objects. –  Felix Kling Jan 8 '13 at 12:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Yes, you can:

var itemId = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10];
var itemName = ["A","B","C","D","E","F","G","H","I","J"];

var currentItemIndex = 5;

var ItemCatalog = {
    itemIds: itemId,
    itemNames: itemName
};

Another way to assign variables to your object would be:

var ItemCatalog = {}
// or like you did: var ItemCatalog = new Object(); That's the same as = {}

// Then:
ItemCatalog.itemIds = itemId;
// Or
ItemCatalog['itemNames'] = itemName;

Notice how I replaced your object / array initialisations with object / array literals. Both work, but I prefer the literals, since they're shorter.

share|improve this answer
    
Syntax error after itemId; should change it to itemId, –  Anton Jan 8 '13 at 12:43
    
@Anton: Yup, thanks! –  Cerbrus Jan 8 '13 at 12:44
    
Upvote also for literals –  Pablo González Alba Jan 8 '13 at 12:49
    
thanks... It works :) –  Ankit Tanna Jan 8 '13 at 13:32

yes

var ItemCatalog = {
    itemId : itemId,
    itemName : itemName 
}
share|improve this answer

You can just assign the arrays as values of properties of the object, like this:

// setup arrays here...

var itemCatalog = {
    itemId: itemId;
    itemNames: itemName
};

However if id and name are associated, why not add them in a single array? Something like this:

items = [];
items.push({ id: 1, name: 'A' });
items.push({ id: 2, name: 'B' });

console.log(items[0].name); // = A
share|improve this answer

Yes. Continuing the code you've posted:

ItemCatalog.itemId = itemId;
ItemCatalog.itemName = itemName;

However, you can do this at the same time as creating the array, which saves cluttering up your current scope with an unnecessary variable:

var ItemCatalog = new Object();

ItemCatalog.itemId = new Array();
ItemCatalog.itemName = new Array();

ItemCatalog.itemId.push(1);
...

ItemCatalog.itemName.push("A");
...

Note also that by convention in JavaScript, names starting with a capital letter are used for constructor functions rather than objects. (At least according to Douglas Crockford.)

So this would be more idiomatic:

var itemCatalog = new Object();
share|improve this answer

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