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The user inputs books which I have to collect in an array. Could you help me understand why when I enter the second book, the first one is erisen? I defined BOOK aux globally...

Could you help me understand why I can't collect

#define   stop __asm nop
#include "book.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>

using namespace std;

int counter = 0;
BOOK aux [1];

void print_catalogue()
{

}

void print_book(BOOK aBook)
{
    cout << endl;
    cout <<aBook.Autor<<", "<<aBook.Title<<", "<<aBook.Year<<", "<<aBook.PageCount<<", "<<aBook.Cost<<endl; 
}


void new_book()
{
    BOOK temp;
    system("cls");
    cin.getline (temp.Autor, 20);
    cout <<"ENTERING NEW BOOK: " << endl <<endl;
    cout <<"Input the author: ";
    cin.getline (temp.Autor, 20);
    cout  <<"Input the title: ";
    cin.getline (temp.Title, 50);
    cout  <<"Input the year of publishing: ";
    cin >>  temp.Year;
    cout  <<"Input the number of pages: ";
    cin >>  temp.PageCount;
    cout  <<"Input the cost: ";
    cin >>  temp.Cost;
    cout << endl;   

    counter++;

    BOOK * pn = new BOOK [counter];
    if (counter > 0)
    {
        memcpy(pn, aux, counter * sizeof(BOOK));    
    }
    pn[counter - 1] = temp;

    BOOK * aux = new BOOK[counter];
    memcpy(aux,pn, counter * sizeof(BOOK));

    delete[] pn;

    for (int i = 0; i < counter; i++)
    {
        print_book(aux[i]);
    }   

    system("pause");
    return;
}

void delete_books()
{

}

 void write_catalogue()
 {

 }

 void read_catalogue()
 {

 }

void menu()
{
    char command;
    do
    {       
        system("cls");

        cout << "p - Print the whole catalogue."<< endl;
        cout << "n - Input a new book." << endl;
        cout << "d - Delete existing book(s)." << endl;
        cout << "w - Write the catalogue to a file." << endl;
        cout << "r - Read the catalogue from a file." << endl;
        cout << "Input a new command: ";
        cin >> command;


        cout << endl << endl;
        switch (command) 
        {
            case 'p': print_catalogue(); break;
            case 'n': new_book(); break;
            case 'd': delete_books(); break;
            case 'w': write_catalogue(); break;
            case 'r': read_catalogue(); break;
            case 'q': return;
            default : 
                {
                    cout << "Please, enter a correct command." << endl;
                    system("pause");
                }
        }

    } while(true);
}

void main()
{
    menu();

}
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3  
Why raw pointers? Why memcpy? Why system("pause")? –  leemes Jan 8 '13 at 13:11
2  
Why don't you use the vector? –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 8 '13 at 13:11
2  
Have you used a debugger to see the memory state? It will help you a lot. –  coelhudo Jan 8 '13 at 13:11
4  
All your questions suggest that you really didn't listen to my advice and try actually reading a book. Why are you so opposed to knowledge? SO isn't your private tutor. –  Bartek Banachewicz Jan 8 '13 at 13:14
2  
There's so much wrong about this code... Start by introducing a vector of books. Stop copying so much around. This makes me crazy. –  leemes Jan 8 '13 at 13:14
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closed as too localized by leemes, Paul R, sashoalm, Tadeusz Kopec, stusmith Jan 8 '13 at 14:36

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your global aux is a constant pointer to one BOOK – aux[0] and no more. You can not copy more than one BOOK hier. You redefine a local aux, with hide the global. What you put there is “leak” after the functions new_book() returned.

Use std::string and containers, and don’t abuse pointers and global variables.

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